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Robinia neomexicana

 
Crt Jakhel
Posts: 140
Location: NE Slovenia, zone 6a
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Hi all,

I'm looking for seed of robinia neomexicana - the small tree that's supposedly blooming somewhat later than black locust but has a similar resistance to drought, cold etc.

My motivation is creating an environment for bees that would offer a lot of summer forage. Black locust is our main spring flow and the bees love it so when I found about a later-flowering species I started looking.

It's hard. I was not able to locate an active commercial source online. This kinda makes me blush because I consider myself handy with Google

Does anyone know a vendor that has this kind of seed in stock?

I would need to have it shipped to Slovenia, Europe.

Thanks!
 
Crt Jakhel
Posts: 140
Location: NE Slovenia, zone 6a
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Eureka! Found it here https://www.plantsofthesouthwest.com/ -- in case somebody else is also looking for it.
 
Bill Erickson
garden master
Posts: 894
Location: Northwest Montana from Zone 3a to 4b (multiple properties)
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Good job! Your google-fu is excellent.
 
Crt Jakhel
Posts: 140
Location: NE Slovenia, zone 6a
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Well... My first attempt was unimpressive. I've read that these can be hard to germinate but I guess I didn't fully appreciate it.

In late spring of 2016 I used 12 seeds and put them through the hot water soak twice during 2 days. They let out color and swelled nicely. Things were looking good.

By the time autumn came I had one single good looking young tree about a foot and a half tall. I'm not entirely sure that it will make it to spring because the winter has been unusually dry so far - since the last week of November we've had about 50 days of no rain or snow worth mentioning until yesterday and the top layer of soil was definitely below freezing. I'm counting on the Robinia family being tough plants.

For this year's round, here's what I'll be trying out:

- taking hot water more seriously - placing seed in boiling water then taking the pot off the stove immediately - see http://morasc.nmsu.edu/docs/Seed%20Scarification%20Requirements%20for%20Robinia%20neomexicana.pdf
- using a nail clipper to puncture the hard shell (risky because critical parts can get clipped)
- shaking the seed in a hard-walled container at speed -- see https://www.treesearch.fs.fed.us/pubs/31412

I hope to get at least 5 trees established and from that point onwards they sould be able to take on the task of propagation themselves.
 
Ray South
Posts: 60
Location: Northern Tablelands, NSW, Australia
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Good luck with your project and thanks for the link to the article about germination. It explains what I was doing wrong with my Robinia pseudoacacia.
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