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Antonio Scotti
Posts: 49
Location: Spain
forest garden fungi urban
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Hi all,
I am new to permies.com....

I'm looking for info about growing food near airport sites.
What safety mesures might be in order before starting to grow food there. What kind of pollution is the most probable?
Is it safe to just let the crops (veggies) grow on open ground or would it be better to set up some kind of cover for the growing beds?
I am thinking on flying compounds/particles assuming that those could be any worse of what can be found in cities, near high traffic roads.
Any real life experiencies to share?

Regards
 
John Wolfram
Posts: 652
Location: Lafayette, Indiana
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When I was getting my pilot's license, not once was de-icing fluid ever sprayed on my little piper warrior. It might be a problem if you live next to a major regional hub in a cold climate, but for the vast majority of airports I would not be worried.

As part of the pre-flight inspection, a bit of Jet A fuel was taken out, inspected, and then dumped on the ground. Supposedly Jet A has lead in it, so over time that might be a problem. Airports tend to be huge in terms of land area (5,000+ foot runways take a bit of space) so there's a good chance that even being right next to an airport you're a mile or two away from a major source of containment.
 
John Polk
steward
Posts: 8019
Location: Currently in Lake Stevens, WA. Home in Spokane
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A former neighbor was a commercial jet pilot. He was also deeply involved in artisan wine making.
When his property could no longer accommodate the quantity of grapes required, he leased space at LAX to grow grapes between some of the runways.

He went on to become a well recognized vintner, and eventually (after retiring from aviation), purchased substantial acreage further north. But his first vineyard was smack dab inside LAX. Apparently, he saw no danger. Sold premium wines in a members only club near the airport, and most of the members were involved, one way or another to aviation. Perhaps their closeness to the industry caused them to turn a blind eye, but then again, if there were dangers, I'm sure they would have purchased elsewhere.



 
Tyler Ludens
pollinator
Posts: 9742
Location: Central Texas USA Latitude 30 Zone 8
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In my opinion, a garden soil which is full of organic material and life, and especially fungi, will take care of most contaminants.

http://radicalmycology.com/educational-tools/human-uses-of-mushrooms/mycoremediation-101/
 
Antonio Scotti
Posts: 49
Location: Spain
forest garden fungi urban
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Hi,
well your replies so far sound encouraging
Thanks
 
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