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Gardening Without Irrigation: Or Without Much, Anyway by Steve Solomon  RSS feed

 
pollinator
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Location: 7b at 1050 feet, precipitation average 13 inches, irrigated, Okanagan Valley
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source Amazon.com

Summary:

This book was first published in 1993 and placed into the public domain by the author. Some copies do not include pictures, charts, and other graphic elements.
Mr. Solomon writes about how he was able to minimize his irrigation use in Oregon west of the Cascades.

Where to get it:

McNally Robinson
Amazon.com
Chapters
 
Vera Stewart
pollinator
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Location: 7b at 1050 feet, precipitation average 13 inches, irrigated, Okanagan Valley
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I give this book 7 acorns out of 10.
I was unfortunate to unknowingly order a copy of this book that did not include the photos, etc., and lacking them some of the enjoyment and understanding was lost for me. However, that's not Mr. Solomon's fault.
The main premise of this book is that increased density requires increased irrigation, due to increased competition at the root level. There is also discussion about a "dust mulch" layer that I admit I did not fully understand. However, I commend any and all attempts to grow stuff while using less water, and this book may provide a useful introduction - and just a second voice saying that yes, you can try dry farming out west, but will be of particular use to people sharing the same PNW climate as the author. My "ah ha!" moment while reading this book was in regards to the difference between sandy soils and clay soils, I grew up with very clay-y soil, and realized that I subconsciously expect giant cracks to form down into the ground in the summer without watering, but this isn't my necessary doom now that I live with soil that has far less clay. This realization alone made the book worth reading for me.
 
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Vera Stewart wrote:
The main premise of this book is that increased density requires increased irrigation, due to increased competition at the root level.



I just watched a video which offers evidence that this may be a faulty premise. Gabe Brown grew a dense polyculture under dry conditions in which single-species plantings died, and the polyculture thrived.

Sorry, I can't remember exactly where in this long video he talks about it: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9yPjoh9YJMk
 
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