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Eating Invasive Japanese Knot Weed

 
gardener
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Japanese Knot Weed is a very invasive plant here. If you chop it, it flows downriver and grows where it stops on land. However, it is also the highest naturally occurring source of resveratrol. Take that you red wine drinkers!

I have heard that the shoots of the plant are good to eat. Does anyone have any recipes? I would love to learn how to eat it, improve my health, and slow down its invasiveness.
Thanks,
John S
PDX OR
 
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Location: South of Winona, Minnesota
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I've dug then dried, chopped, and ground roots for tea. When the tea is taken in combination with doxycycline for Lyme disease, it improves the effectiveness of the medication's ability to pop the cell walls of the Lyme bacteria. The powdered roots can also be added to other dishes. I've also had some carob brownies made with the tops. They were made by someone else so I don't have the recipe, but they were delicious (gluten and sugar-free). She also had some other dishes made with the leaves and stems but I can't recall them exactly as it has been many years ago, but she was using the whole plant for culinary purposes. I grew some once in a metal tub from root pieces that were harvested for tea (from a park with permission - they were leaving the patch for the local herb club to keep harvested and under "control"). I was careful to keep it from going to seed and harvested it out at the end of the growing season. Any small leftover pieces of plant debris were dehydrated and the dried bits were spread on the gravel road by our place, to be extra sure that nothing would survive and spread. I've read that it can even break up concrete when it gets going.
 
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Should be eaten in moderation! http://www.eattheweeds.com/japanese-knotweed-dreadable-edible/
 
John Suavecito
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Thanks. Green Deane is a rock star. My wife makes a rhubarb sauce that we put on pancakes, etc. Should work with knotweed.
I want to try the vegetable too.

When you ferment oxalic vegetables, they become less oxalic.
JOhn S
PDX OR
 
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