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Wood tea ferilizer?

 
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hi...
greetings from india.
after browsing this forum several times, i have signed up to ask just this question.
apologies in advance if it's downright crazy.
is there some way to extract a fertilizer tea out of wood?
i mean taking off from how hugelkultur works, i asked myself if anyone has steeped wood in a tank and used the liquid as a fertilizer in aquaponics? similar to comfrey and worm tea for example?
thanks for your views and suggestions
-dv
 
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Location: Portlandish, Oregon
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Hmm, It might be possible, though it would not work as well I would imagine. Comfrey and plant teas have more nitrogen than carbon. Worm tea is made from fully decomposed carbon and nitrogen components. Wood is very high carbon low nitrogen, it would simply not decompose quickly enough in the water.
 
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Location: Virginia (zone 7)
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I know that you can make your own rooting hormone by snipping a few willow (any kind) branches into 1 inch pieces, soaking in a quart of water for several days, then strain and use the water. Since we had a really old dead willow taken down recently, I break up the wood that's brittle and soak it in water, then put the wet wood in the bottom of planting holes.
IMG_20160602_164649948.jpg
[Thumbnail for IMG_20160602_164649948.jpg]
Willow wood soaking
 
dv sridharan
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thanks shawn and karen
what if we steeped wood and comfrey together. what would that leachate contain?
and karen, would only willow do?
i am totally ignorant of chemistry of wood in water; not just damp wood, i mean.
-dv
 
Karen Donnachaidh
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IMO,the permaculture answer to anything is " try it and see what works". I've read about willows being natural rooting hormones, as for any other tree's that have this property (contains salicylic acid) IDK. It's worth an experiment.
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