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Processing firewood with tree loppers. A test.  RSS feed

 
Dale Hodgins
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I did some hedge work yesterday and got enough small sticks to do a firewood cutting test. I often take branches down to quite small firewood, in order to reduce the number of loads taken to the branch dump.

I'm using large Fiskars loppers. The ones with a gear that multiplies the force on the cutting blade. Whenever I have  large amounts of fairly large sticks , I don't hold the tool with both hands. Instead, I  put one of the rubber hand holds against the pavement,  braced with my foot. This allows fairly large material to be cut by simply bearing down on the other  handle. Much easier than the serious peck workout which occurs when loppers are held in two hands.

The pile of wood was enough to fill the large garbage can pictured. There were 139 pieces ranging from three quarters of an inch 2 one and three quarter inch diameter.

It took 6 1/2 minutes.
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Long
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Cut
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One handle touches the ground
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Notice the gear
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Typical size range
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139 pieces
 
Abbey Battle
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Location: Wealden AONB
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More or less what I have always done. I have both willows and ash trees that I pollard for small firewood. Have a very small fire place in my bedroom, will only take that kind of small size wood.
Have always used my loppers in that way, as you say, much les effort.
 
Mike Cantrell
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Location: Mid-Michigan
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Nice! I've coveted a pair of those loppers for a while.

I assume you've been around long enough to know how much it helps to keep them really sharp, but for other readers: what a difference! Loppers are sharpenable with a fine file.
 
Judith Browning
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Location: Arkansas Ozarks zone 7 alluvial,black,deep loam/clay with few rocks, wonderful creek bottom!
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I have a pair of them! One of the best buys I've made...I used to struggle to cut with the regular ones after using for awhile, with these it's hard to get me to stop
 
Dale Hodgins
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I always use them in a manner that allows the cut to be opened by gravity. If turned over the other way, the weight of the wood tends to close the cut. Not so important when processing firewood, but very important when cutting branches that are leaning hard in one direction.

Always lop wood on the day that it is cut. Wood cuts easiest during a light rain. For really tough stuff, I sometimes dip my loppers in the used deep fryer oil that is normally reserved for my chainsaws and hedge cutters. It's free.
 
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