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How long until harvested pea-seeds can be replanted?

 
Tobias Ber
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Location: Northern Germany (Zone 8a)
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hey...

i ve got some overgrown pea-pods. they turn yellow, wrinkly and peas are starting to taste bitter. i want to replant them. do they need to dry inbetween? or can i plant them right away and they ll germinate?

thank you and have a nice weekend
tobias
 
Joseph Lofthouse
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If I irrigate pea pods that are just starting to dry down, they will germinate in the pods. So plant them any time. My experience is that they don't need to be dried first.

 
Su Ba
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I concur with Joseph. There is no dormancy period for pea seed. Once the seed is mature, even before the pod dries down, the seed can germinate if there is enough moisture. During a constant wet week of rain, I've had peas germinate right in the pods, thus ruining my seed crop.
 
Tobias Ber
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thank you very much.
so i ll replant some and save some seeds.

this leads to more questions. arugula, lettuces, spinach and radishes are going to seed. some seeds are near maturity by now. if they self seed, will there be another harvest this year?


they have been bolting very quickly this year. i planted in march, last frost date is 9.april. we had some very warm days in may. is that enough to let them get to seed that fast?
i think, i m gonna plant more of these in late summer and fall.
 
Tyler Ludens
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In my experience, even a day or two of unusually hot weather can make plants such as lettuce bolt, especially if they aren't specifically bred to withstand heat. You might want to save seeds from those to plant in the Fall, and get some heat-tolerant kinds to try next Spring. I expect we will all have to deal with much more erratic weather in the coming years.
 
Joseph Lofthouse
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Tobias Ber wrote:this leads to more questions. arugula, lettuces, spinach and radishes are going to seed. some seeds are near maturity by now. if they self seed, will there be another harvest this year?


Depends... Self seeding species often have tremendous competition from the species that are already growing. I often get volunteers from many species, even among already existing vegetation, but for highest productivity, I prefer to replant immediately after the seeds mature into ground that has been weeded before planting.
 
Joseph Lofthouse
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In my experience, beans, tomatoes, corn, and squash are other species that don't need to dry down, and don't need a period of dormancy.

 
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