• Post Reply
  • Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic

Peach seed planting

 
Jade Crowley
Posts: 16
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I ended up getting about 20 5 gallon buckets full of peaches this year for my chickens, it was all the fruit that fell off a tree, so now I have a lot of peach seeds laying in my front yard. I am wondering if I can take those seeds and plant them, I understand they might not be good tasting peaches but considering we don't have many trees in the surrounding 5 miles I figured it may just be good to grow anything at all.  Next problem is we have bad ground and we only get 10"-13" of rain per year, so it's very dry as well. I was thinking if I was going to plant them that I could dig a trench, fill the bottom of it with small branches and wood cuttings from my firewood supply and then put some dirt over the branches and plant the seed on that. Then mulch or straw or something over the bare earth, I could water with the hose once a week or so throughout spring summer and fall as a way to keep them watered but would this be enough? Would this even be a good idea? Anyone have any thoughts on this? Thanks!
 
Virginia Ratliff
Posts: 34
Location: Bartow County GA
1
chicken duck rabbit
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
A friend just gave me a basket full of "dent and scratch" local peaches...but they taste great! I had the same idea...lots of clay here, I am in central GA. I found this on Motherearth News...
Peach seed info

I am going to try it...I have planted Meyer lemon seeds...I have 4 trees in the greenhouse that are 2 years old and about a foot high now! Going to transplant them into the yard this spring!

Sorry I don't have any first hand experience to offer but I do wish you luck and hopefully you will have a great outcome!

 
Troy Rhodes
Posts: 572
21
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
My dad and I have both had good luck just eating the peach, burying the peach pits in compost and wait to see what comes up.

Don't let them dry out, straight from the peach to the compost.


Most pit fruits (peaches, plums, apricots, cherries) reproduce fairly true to the parent.


Of that group, apricots are the most drought resistant.

 
John Polk
master steward
Pie
Posts: 8016
Location: Currently in Lake Stevens, WA. Home in Spokane
269
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I once ate a nectarine, and just tossed the pit over towards the fence.
Two summers later, that 3 1/2 foot tree gave me a small, but edible fruit.

(I moved shortly thereafter, and have no idea how the tree is doing now, but I was certainly impressed with the quick results.)
 
Miles Flansburg
steward
Posts: 3662
Location: Zones 2-4 Wyoming and 4-5 Colorado
134
bee books forest garden fungi greening the desert hugelkultur
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Here in Denver I always just throw my pits into a hole in the garden, cover with leaves and forget them. I have had trees come up several years latter after I had forgotten all about them. I am still waiting to see if they will set fruit though.
 
Simone Gar
Posts: 84
Location: Alberta, zone 3
1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I have done apple and plums successfully. I will try peaches and nectarines too. My first concern is one that's hardy enough (zone 3), taste comes later.
 
Dan Stanifer
Posts: 2
Location: On our way to NE Tennessee
chicken dog food preservation
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
This is timely, I have a dozen peach pits in the beer fridge now. I did not give thought to time of year, I just wanted to see if I could get them to sprout. If they do I am not sure how to keep them going until next spring. I am in north central MN at this point but have property in TN that we will be moving to in 2 years. I was hoping to get them to go in TN.
 
Bill Erickson
garden master
Pie
Posts: 787
Location: Northwest Montana from Zone 3a to 4b (multiple properties)
75
books chicken forest garden hugelkultur hunting wofati
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Try potting them up and letting them grow until they go dormant in a cool spot - or they just may grow through the winter since there isn't any frost/freezing to deal with inside a house.
Come spring, harden them off outside and increase the size of the pot they are in until you do make your move south. Keep them in a cool, dark place next fall/winter so they get used to that idea of seasonal dormancy. I wouldn't be afraid to give them a good trim to keep their size down either. Plenty of time to let them put on the growth once you get them into that Tennessee dirt.
 
Wink, wink, nudge, nudge, say no more ... richsoil.com/cards
  • Post Reply
  • Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic