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Insect attraction polyculture "plugs", does it have a market?

 
pollinator
Posts: 1559
Location: Denver, CO
60
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I'm thinking that I will lay down a big sheet of landscape fabric, place a wooden frame, and fill it with a few inches of potting mix. Then I will sprinkle on a mix of seeds for a guild of insect attracting plants, to flower from early spring to late fall. I could do either an annual or a perennial mix. When folks came to buy plants, I would cut them squares of "sod". They couldn't roll it out like sod, but it would have a similar consistency, and the "plugs" could be spaced out to eventually grow together and cover the space. (They'd need to be planted, of course, not laid on the soil surface.)

To keep it together, I'd have to either: include an aggressive running plant like yarrow, or plant an annual grass which I could kill before planting the desired seeds, leaving a mat of roots and stems.

Would this work, and, would there be a market?

Maybe I could try other guilds as well, edibles etc.
 
gardener
Posts: 1870
Location: Just northwest of Austin, TX
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forest garden urban
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Sounds like a genius idea to me. Have you ever seen the 'Roll and Grow' products? They have horrible reputations and yet ever year I still see them in the stores, so people are still taking a chance on this concept from seed. I think that's a proof of concept. Yours would have a much better chance of actual success in the garden. It would also have more appeal to our instant gratification society with already mature plants that much closer to blooming.

I wonder, as far as getting a cuttable sod like growing media, if you had a source for unprocessed sheeps wool or maybe cotton, would it work as an underlayer which could hold sections together long enough to be tranported to a new garden? I'm just brainstorming here, sorry if I'm making things overly complicated. I'm just guessing at a material I think might hold up long enough for this purpose.
 
pollinator
Posts: 998
Location: Nevada, Mo 64772
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Most sheep need to be sheared. Not all wool is marketable. My friends used to have to shear their sheep and throw the wool away. If you found the right sheep farmer, you should be able to get some very cheap.
 
Gilbert Fritz
pollinator
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Location: Denver, CO
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Would wool make it difficult to cut apart? Or would it have degraded enough after a few months of being wet? I'm hoping to be able to cut this stuff up with a sharp spade.
 
Casie Becker
gardener
Posts: 1870
Location: Just northwest of Austin, TX
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forest garden urban
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I don't know how fast wool biodegrades. I was more worried about suggesting something that would degrade too fast to be useful. I did think that wool that hadn't been spun into yarn would already be easier to cut with a spade.
 
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