Win a copy of The Biotime Log this week in the Permaculture forum!
  • Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
permaculture forums growies critters building homesteading energy monies living kitchen purity ungarbage community wilderness fiber arts art permaculture artisans regional education experiences global resources the cider press projects digital market permies.com all forums
this forum made possible by our volunteer staff, including ...
master stewards:
  • Nicole Alderman
  • raven ranson
stewards:
  • paul wheaton
  • Jocelyn Campbell
  • Julia Winter
garden masters:
  • Anne Miller
  • Pearl Sutton
  • thomas rubino
  • Bill Crim
  • Kim Goodwin
  • Joylynn Hardesty
gardeners:
  • Amit Enventres
  • Mike Jay
  • Dan Boone

Most leaf-litter per tree  RSS feed

 
Posts: 74
Location: Southeast Michigan
3
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Sort of a sepecific question, does anyone know if there's information on the average amount of leaf litter produced by different trees and shrubs?

Curious regarding different parts of a set-and-forget soil building method, this is just one of a thousand questions that go into it, but it's one i'm having trouble finding data on
 
pollinator
Posts: 1985
Location: Cincinnati, Ohio,Price Hill 45205
62
forest garden trees urban
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
While not a huge producer of leaf litter per say, Gumball/Sweetgum trees  produce a lot of biomass in the form of leaves, "gumballs", and flowers.


Poplar and willow are noted for their speedy growth, but how much leafy boimass they produce is a good question.
 
Posts: 944
Location: Graham, Washington [Zone 7b, 47.041 Latitude] 41inches average annual rainfall, cool summer drought
31
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I don't know of any lists of leaf litter per tree but I know Paulownia Elongata produces an immense amount. I'd expect the same of Tomentosa [which might survive in your climate, online it's said to go down to Zone 5, not sure what your local 'average low temperature' is]...

Red Alder too, but I don't believe that's hardy to your area [but other Alder might be.]
 
Posts: 108
Location: Cave Junction, Oregon
1
food preservation forest garden hugelkultur
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
My non scientific answer is big leaf maple.. my yard is easily a foot deep in leaves and the tree is not done dumping yet!
 
Posts: 6
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Another anecdotal answer - Sycamores - native, fast growing, first to loose leaves, last to put them out. We get fairly large leaf mold piles from the 7, 18 year old trees.
 
pollinator
Posts: 1453
Location: northern California
64
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Just as important for some designs is not just how much leaf litter is produced, but over what timeframe, and how durable is it to weather and decay.  A Paulownia might drop a lot, but after a few rains it's pretty much gone.  A eucalyptus or holly or pine tree might not produce so much, especially not all at one season (true of many evergreens), but what is dropped is durable and relatively resistant to decay, and can last for years and build up a thick mulch.  This can be a resource in certain settings and climates, and a problem (such as a fire hazard) in others.
 
Those who dance are thought mad by those who hear not the music. This tiny ad plays the bagpipes:
It's like binging on 7 seasons of your favorite netflix permaculture show
http://permaculture-design-course.com/
  • Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
Boost this thread!