I just dropped the price of
the permaculture playing cards
for a wee bit.

 

 

uses include:
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What mushrooms are best to grow for decomposing doggie poo? (odd question within)  RSS feed

 
Agnese Murrian
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So I got the idea of making a real turf potty for my dogs. They are getting older and sometimes need to have some place to go while indoors. I looked at some options to create a frame to house real grass turf and it came to me that perhaps there is a way to grow mushrooms that would be harmless to the dog while helping decompose whatever poo was left after the initial cleaning. Is this even possible?! Perhaps some of the wizards on this board would know if it is so!

Thanks!
 
Rick Hatchh
Posts: 3
Location: Penticton, Canada
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There is a section about this in Tradd Cotter' s book. I think he used oyster spawn in 5gal Paul's with straw or wood chips. I'll have a look and get back to you.
 
Ellie Strand
Posts: 39
Location: Eau Claire, WI
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books cat dog food preservation hugelkultur urban
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Following cuz I also have dogs. Sounds like a real interesting proposition.
 
Ben Zumeta
Posts: 204
Location: Redwood Country, Zone 9, 60" rain/yr,
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dog duck hugelkultur
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Ever tried Bokashi? It is the best organic breakdown method I know of for meat and carnivore wastes or when in sub-ideal composting conditions (i.e. too wet or dry or acidic etc). This is because it is produced by a the fermenting of a robust, diverse ecosystem (ideally the most diverse compost tea you can make). In doing so you are selecting out the most badass decomposers in the bunch and are multiplying them by combining the tea  with grain and molasses in an anaerobic environment. You do not need to buy the EM or other stuff sold as bokashi starter if you can make a good aerobic compost tea. I use duck pond water, molasses and wormcastings aerated for 24-48hrs as a good base tea. I then add more molasses to warm water (I use recipes online just make my own microbial colony) to continue the replication of organisms, mix with the tea at about equal parts, and mix with wheat bran (you can use rice or barley or any grain with good protein content but this is cheapest here) to a dry oatmeal consistency (just a drop or two of moisture should come out when squeezed firmly). This is then firmly packed in a sealed bucket for 2-4 weeks (shorter is fine but longer breeds even tougher microbes, too a point). It should smell like wheat beer when done, sweet and fermented, with a white network of fungus. Blackish or green fungus is a bad sign and I toss it under my established evergreens. When done the bokashi can then be air dried and stored indefinitely. I spread about a 50lb bag's worth over my 1/2acre every spring after the heaviest rains have passed. This gets everything breaking down very quickly, whether leaves or straw mulch or dog and bird poo. I also use it to inoculate compost teas, birds' water, mulch and soil with some great, tough bacteria and fungus that is beneficial for pretty much everything people like. It will not however, turn a bucket of dog poo into anything nice. I tried :p

I would also try to bury dog and cat poo well beneath 4-6" of organic matter or dirt, ideally where non-food bearing trees will absorb any runoff before it hits a stream or drain.
 
Tobias Ber
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Location: Northern Germany (Zone 8a)
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have you thought of using compost-worms?
 
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