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Taming wild blackberries  RSS feed

 
Mary Leonard
Posts: 27
Location: Jackson, United States
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I've got blackberries interspersed throughout the woods on my property with a good sized number of bushes easily accessible in my front yard area. The problem is that while I can get to them they're either difficult to get to the entire bush because it's basically on a cliff by the main road, up steep embankments or in the middle of where I plan on building important things such as a bigger better coop and run. While I can just protect the bushes in the chicken run area and let the chickens eat the fruit, the other plants I'd like to see if I can move to a central location to better keep up with pruning and get some noticeable production off of them. Last year's harvest was only about 2-3 cups worth of berries. They were yummy but those were from the roadside so definitely needed washed first! Some of these vines I'l probably be moving to train them along my goat pasture fencing once I get that put in.

Any advice on how best to accomplish this would be helpful.
 
Travis Johnson
pollinator
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I accidentally grazed some raspberries out of existence with my flock of sheep. I did not mean too. The patch of domestic raspberries were in the family for generations and produced thumb sized raspberries and yet in a day or two my sheep got in there and grazed them out of existence. (They will graze poison ivy too, their preferred food).

If berries get their roots exposed to the sun, they die, so while I do not have any immediate way for you to accomplish that, that fact might help your battle.

 
Mary Leonard
Posts: 27
Location: Jackson, United States
chicken forest garden trees
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Oh boy I would feel so bad letting that happen!!! Thanks for the advice on over-grazing and to not let the roots get exposed.

Fortunately I've only got two goats for now and only plan on having a maximum of about a half dozen goats/sheep with room for babies to be sold off. We're going to be fencing in our first area late summer/early fall this year. For now our focus is on terracing an area for vegetable gardens and the blackberries are part of that food production so need moved soon so they can start growing in the spring.

Yes, our goats ate down quite a few sections but fortunately they only ate the leaves and didn't eat them to the ground. I'm going to cut the ones I'm moving down to about 1-1.5 feet tall then transplant them to an area the goats will NOT be having access to! They may have the end of season clippings and what grows through their fence.
 
Rebecca Norman
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Location: Ladakh, Indian Himalayas at 10,500 feet, zone 5
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Years ago my father used to throw planks of wood down onto the blackberry bushes to make crevasses for us to get and harvest from.
 
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