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New pear tree?  RSS feed

 
Kenneth Boyd
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Last year, I cut down two pear trees that were intwined. One was Bartlet, the other sugar (we believe).
Now I have two stalks growing up out of one of the two stumps. It has thorns at the end of the branches. The previous trees didn't have thorns.
I am hoping that a new pear tree would grow in it's place to add to my orchard.
Is this a "rootsprout?" I'm hoping to do the same with a cherry tree stump.
If it is a pear, how long will thorns be on it? When can I expect fruit? Could it be another breed of pear/fruit? I'm pretty new to the orchard growth area.
 
David Livingston
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It could be wild pear root stock and if so it could produce pears but they will not be so good , it could also be a number of other types of tree only time will tell .
Post a pic of some leaves / flowers

David
 
Kenneth Boyd
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No leaves to take a picture of. Maybe in a month or so.
It's not in a good spot, shaded by huge pine trees.
I might want to let the stump die.
 
James Freyr
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I do believe the thorny shoot is from the rootstock that the Bartlet or other were grafted to. The thorns won't go away, and it is possible that the flowers of the rootstock may be sterile and will not bear fruit, not that you would want to eat them anyway. Fruit from rootstocks are generally unpalatable and are not good to eat fresh, not to say you can't use them to ferment a tasty beverage, as that is the end use of most apples that aren't good for fresh eating. If the blossoms are indeed fertile, and since the rootstock is good and established underground, there is no telling how long before it bears fruit. It's possible it could bear a pear or two this year, or it could be many years.
 
Kenneth Boyd
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That's good to know. This is almost 150ft from my mini-orchard. I have a cherry stump in my.orchard, conveniently in a row, right in a perfect.spot to grow a tree. I can dry out the stump and later plant a tree when the stump is totally dead in a couple of years.
I was thinking a new cherry would sprout up and I'd get a free tree. Had one sprout last year, but a windstorm broke it at it's base
 
David Livingston
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Have you thought of learning to graft ? that way you can cheaply increace the number of fruit trees you have plus swap with other folks to get new types of fruit for free .
 
Kenneth Boyd
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David, no I haven't but would like to know more about grafting. What can you tell me?
I have a cherry tree stump in my orchard row, maybe graft something off of it?
 
David Livingston
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I would check out these guys https://www.rhs.org.uk/advice/profile?pid=443
there are lots of you tube clips as well such as this guy 

Basically you need to learn what you can add to what . I plant lots of quince ( hard wood cuttings  basically free ) because I know I can graft apples and pears on to it  I use one of these https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mIoa6sI5m14 cost about 20$

David
 
I agree. Here's the link: http://stoves2.com
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