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Can I go ahead with my plan to put all these native/medicinal/edible together in one bed?

 
Posts: 17
Location: 6b Atlantic City NJ
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I've been going a bit overboard with natives recently and keep adding in new beds. My latest desire is to guild all of the following together in one hugul bed. I'm still a bit green so I'm wondering if anyone has any suggestions for me, especially if anything shouldnt belong or if there is a better arrangement.

New bed running West to North, odd shape roughly 70sqft.
Grid:
--- North---
West ----- East

-White Yarrow- Serviceberry--
Red Yarrow -- Comfrey
Japanese Maple ---
--St Johns Wort (not the woody variety)
----Sorrel.

This will be my most visible bed for people walking by viewing it from the west & north, so I hope it has a lot of ornamental appeal. Thanks for reading.
 
gardener
Posts: 1870
Location: Just northwest of Austin, TX
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I can't speak to all of those, but the yarrow jumps out at me immediately as something that needs full sun. That's Texas sun I'm thinking of and we often grow full sun plants from other parts of the world in the shade. In my area, at least, Japanese maples do better in more shady environments.
 
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I've read that trees on top of hugel can be iffy because of settling. I hope some people comment that have actual experience with trees on hugel.

My theory is that anything is fine planted with anything else. What grows well together will do so. What doesn't fit in will die out, or send propagules to a location that is better suited to it.
 
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Location: Vilonia, Arkansas - Zone 7B/8A stoney, sandy loam soil pH 6.5
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hau Mario, as mentioned, Yarrows need almost full sun all day long to grow best, Japanese Maples prefer to have some shade at the hottest time of the day.
One other thing to take into consideration is full grown size, a Serviceberry will be around 15 feet tall and  some varieties will also be 15 feet in diameter, Japanese Maples are leggy, some as tall as 20 feet and they get large in diameter too.
So, these two will take up a lot of your space when mature.

As mentioned, you do not plant trees (or large bushes) on a hugel, you plant these around the base of the hugel.  trees and hugels
So If you planted a service berry on the north west side and a Japanese maple on the north east side, you will have the space for your other desired plants, and everyone will be happy.
Comfrey, St. Johns Wort, Sorrel and Yarrow will spread, so that too needs to be considered in a planting plan.

May I suggest you do some drawings and draw these plants in as if they are already mature (there are templates for that) so you can see what it will end up looking like before you plant.

Redhawk
 
Mario Lazetti
Posts: 17
Location: 6b Atlantic City NJ
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Thank you much everyone for your responses, I need to modify my plans a bit now and sure am glad I asked (:
 
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