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First year grafts blossoming - should I be concerned?

 
Posts: 115
Location: Trapper Creek, AK (3a)
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I grafted a few apple trees earlier this summer. The ones that seem to have taken are all blossoming. That's never happened to me before. Should I be concerned?

I figure I should pinch off the blossoms to make sure that they concentrate on growing and not on producing fruit. I'm hoping that this isn't some last gasp attempt at procreating before they die.

I'm really hoping some of these make it. A lady down the road let me cut off some scionwood off of her apple tree which I used for these grafts. Then she discovered that her tree had been girdled by voles. I'm hoping that I'll be able to give her something of her old tree that she can plant again.

 
gardener
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Just a reflex and you may have gotten fruiting wood for your grafts. Just pinch the blooms off now, don't let them put any more energy in blooming.

I hope you can give her something back.
 
pollinator
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I would not worry about it just pinch off the flowers as any fruit would be too heavy for the grafting joint . This happens to me often

David
 
Tyler Miller
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That's good to hear! Thanks for the replies.
 
gardener
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Location: Grand Valley of Colorado's Western Slope
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Hi Tyler,
Here is what I know about the  flowering of fruit trees:  The fruit tree makes fruiting buds in the fall, and placement of these buds is related to how much sun that part of the tree gets.  For example on huge old trees, the fruit is set up high in the sun rather than down underneath in the shade.  

Sooo, I'm guessing your scion wood came from a part of the tree that would have been in the sun.

If people want flowers in the winter time, they sometimes cut a few branches of their fruit tree bring them in and put their stems in water in a cool dark closet, and I can't remember how long before the buds will open, but I did it once and the flowers were lovely and such a treat in the winter.
 
Tyler Miller
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Good to know, thanks!
 
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