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Rocket Stove Cooker; 2 fires, 5 hot spots!  RSS feed

 
Kirk Mobert
Posts: 152
Location: Point Arena, Ca
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This stove is entirely made of earthen mixes of one sort of another. The body is mostly adobe bricks with cob. It is insulated with a perlite/clay mix.



First, we laid out the hot-spots. It was decided to stagger the hot-spots so that reaching to the back pot won't burn you.



2 Rocket J-tubes built side-by-side, the closest to the camera is an 8 inch stove, the one in the back, 6 inch.







The only fired brick we used was for the top opening of the feed. It is my experience that if the top edges are adobe (cob), they will be wrecked over time by the wood. Bricks at the top edge of the feed will keep the firebox in good order.





We added in wood storage underneath. This arch passes through to the other side.





To make the heat risers, we placed stovepipe inside of adobe enclosures, packed between with a perlite/clay mix and then pulled the stovepipe out (metal is doomed!)
Here, you can see that the risers are angled, so that the fires will be offset.




























We had some nice stone pieces that served well for keystones in our adobe arches.






Test, a LOT. After the base was built, we ran the stove pretty much the entire time of building the rest.






We insulated in and around the pot holders/hot-spots as much as possible with perlite/clay.






Hot-spots are built to fit a particular pot like a glove. We built the channels like a Lorena stove; pots fit down inside the stove so that heat will flow all around the sides as well as the bottom.


















ALWAYS RUN IT WHILE YOU BUILD IT! This has been my philosophy since the very beginning of my adventures with stovery. It's treated me VERY well.
Yes, you risk burns and smoke inhalation, but if you're paying attention, you can build superior stoves. Use your hands, ears and nose! They are your best guide.












Though the potholes are shaped around a specific pot, reducers can be used to adapt to other pots and pans.















This is as far as we've gotten with this stove. Not documented here yeat is that there will be another, much smaller rocket stove as well; a tiny, 4 inch twig stove will be build into the side. This way, if you just want to boil water for tea, you don't have to start and run the big-guns.
There will also be 2 holders for a variety of beer-can alcohol burning stove that I like so much..


 
Miles Flansburg
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Wow kirk, that is a nice project!

I have never looked into one like this so could you please help me with a few questions ?

Looks like the fire is built and draws up through the holes left where you pulled out the pipes, then across a horizontal opening , above the arch, where the pots sit into holes, is that right?

So is there an outlet/exhaust pipe going out of the wall or roof? Do you just leave a hole open all of the time? How is the draft created?

Do you just clean ash out of the wood feed area? Do you get any ash up under the pots?

When enclosing the "roof" area around the pots how do you make the horizontal "roofing" so that the weight of the pots does not cave in the "roof" ?

The future small rocket will be in that "slot" above the arch ?

 
Kirk Mobert
Posts: 152
Location: Point Arena, Ca
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Miles Flansburg wrote:Wow kirk, that is a nice project!
Looks like the fire is built and draws up through the holes left where you pulled out the pipes, then across a horizontal opening , above the arch, where the pots sit into holes, is that right?


Correct. The heat passes under and around pots and/or pans placed over (or in) each hot spot.


So is there an outlet/exhaust pipe going out of the wall or roof? Do you just leave a hole open all of the time? How is the draft created?


Exhaust will pass out either the first hot-spot left open, or it passes out a final opening near the window, at the end of the lineup. This stove has no chimney. Draft is created by the heat riser of the rocket stove, nothing more.


Do you just clean ash out of the wood feed area? Do you get any ash up under the pots?


Ash is cleaned out of the feed mostly, though some makes it into the channels for the pots. It's easy to deal with in any case.


When enclosing the "roof" area around the pots how do you make the horizontal "roofing" so that the weight of the pots does not cave in the "roof" ?


We place the pots that we want to fit in it's place and cob around them, then we slip the pot(s) out. The cob teds to sag somewhat before it's dry, but some light carving before it's totally dry (when it's still easy) will restore the channel dimensions. Once dry, the cob alone is perfectly capable of dealing with the weight of the pots full of food, and then some. I can get up there and walk around, though it would be a little risky.


The future small rocket will be in that "slot" above the arch ?


Yes. That slot will eventually be the feed. It will pass through an opening just to the right (can't see it in the images) and up a little heat riser there. I'll post changes, if and when they finally occur.

 
Gerry Parent
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Location: Penticton, Canada
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I must admit, the cantilever of adobes over the feeds made me cringe but am glad to see how you can defy my ideas of gravity with a bit of mud!
Very inspirational.  Thank you for posting this project. 
 
Kirk Mobert
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Location: Point Arena, Ca
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Gerry Parent wrote:I must admit, the cantilever of adobes over the feeds made me cringe but am glad to see how you can defy my ideas of gravity with a bit of mud!
Very inspirational.  Thank you for posting this project. 


Yeah, if you want to see gravity defying mud, check out a book called Spectacular Vernacular. It helped me to loose some of my trepidation and experiment more boldly.
I was nervous about that cantilever at first, but so far it's held up. We will see what happens after it's subjected to use.
 
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