Win a copy of For the Love of Paw Paws this week in the Fruit Trees forum!
  • Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
permaculture forums growies critters building homesteading energy monies kitchen purity ungarbage community wilderness fiber arts art permaculture artisans regional education experiences global resources the cider press projects digital market permies.com private forums all forums
this forum made possible by our volunteer staff, including ...
master stewards:
  • Nicole Alderman
  • r ranson
  • Anne Miller
  • paul wheaton
stewards:
  • Jocelyn Campbell
  • Mike Jay Haasl
  • Burra Maluca
garden masters:
  • James Freyr
  • Joylynn Hardesty
  • Steve Thorn
  • Greg Martin
gardeners:
  • Carla Burke
  • Dave Burton
  • Pearl Sutton

Ancient Apricot Tree Question

 
Posts: 4
Location: Central CT
1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I am a new Permies member. I searched the forums and could not find the answer to this specific issue.

Five years ago we bought property in NE KS and inherited a coulee of ancient fruit trees. One is an Asian Pear, the other a 35' tall and wide Apricot likely part of the original homestead which was patented in the 1870s. We are on the original homestead homesite. The tree though having shade tree proportions bears good, tasty fruit, sometimes a lot of fruit if late frosts don't come to do their damage. A few years ago we chilled and planted seed pits of this tree and have several young trees planted elsewhere on the property. Given that the old tree is almost 100% likely an heirloom varietal and because there are no other apricots that I'm aware of in the vicinity to cross-pollinate, will the progeny grow to be the same/very similar to our parent tree? Thanks in advance.
 
master steward & author
Posts: 16332
Location: Left Coast Canada
3848
books chicken cooking fiber arts sheep writing
  • Likes 2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Hello and welcome.

will the progeny grow to be the same/very similar to our parent tree?



Possibly.  You're starting with good genetics, so the result is likely to be delicious.

What I usually do when growing fruit trees from seed is to grow them until the first harvest.  If it is delicious, keep it as is.  If it's not delicious, I'll graft or bud on something that is.  
 
Posts: 93
Location: out in the woods of Maine
9
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Everytime that pollen and seed mix the genes have the option to revert to some earlier variety. I have an apple orchard, apples are notorious for reverting to crabapples. Which is why apples are normally grafted.

I agree with the previous poster, let these young trees grow, and see what they produce.
 
pollinator
Posts: 1003
Location: Nevada, Mo 64772
67
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I'd sure like to buy or trade for some pits if you have extras. I can make some Hardy Chicago fig, white mulberry, or IL Everbearing mulberry. Not sure when the best time to cut them is.
 
gardener
Posts: 6284
Location: Vilonia, Arkansas - Zone 7B/8A stoney, sandy loam soil pH 6.5
1033
hugelkultur dog forest garden duck fish fungi hunting books chicken writing homestead
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Bees will travel up to 3 miles from their hive, this means that if there is just one apricot tree other than yours in that 3 mile range then there is the possibility of cross pollination.
If you want to be certain that the seeds are carrying only the genetics of the "mother" tree then you need to hand pollenate, mark the fruits that you did this to and then harvest those fruits for the seeds.
You can also air layer branches from the mother tree and then plant those once the root system is well established in the sphagnum moss.

The odds seem to be with you but the only way to be certain is to grow some seedlings to fruiting age (7 years normally) and see how those fruits taste compared to the mother tree.

Redhawk
 
Cathy Alcorn
Posts: 4
Location: Central CT
1
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Thanks folks! To further clarify, we live on a rural parcel 8 miles as the crow flies from the nearest town and our tree is the only one that we see in bloom at the time that it blooms in our area but we understand that we might not see small apricot trees near buildings. Apricots are not generally planted here because we are so prone to late frosts and for fruit production, they are not reliable from year to year. Our new trees are in their 3rd year and this year they are really taking off, adding height and girth. Next spring we will possibly have pits from the mother tree. This year the fruit was almost nearly wiped out by a late freeze that lasted for three days. I think we got maybe a dozen this year.
 
Galen Young
Posts: 93
Location: out in the woods of Maine
9
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Your nearest gardening club might be able to help. Our club has an annual Scion Exchange that I attend. From my Spring pruning I bring donations of scion wood. If anyone wants one of my varieties they can take those scions home and graft onto their trees.

If you want cross-pollination you could graft one limb from another variety onto an established tree, via your gardening club.
 
gardener
Posts: 1466
Location: Los Angeles, CA
342
hugelkultur forest garden books urban chicken food preservation
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Apricots sprout so easily.  Perhaps you could collect a bunch of pits and start a small orchard of seedlings, let them fruit out, and then cut down those trees that aren't up to snuff.  

If the tree has been there for that long, I'm surprised that there aren't volunteer seedlings all over the place.  If there are, dig them up, pot them, and see how they do.  Then you can transplant the best of them into your orchard later.
 
What does a metric clock look like? I bet it is nothing like this tiny ad:
This is an example of the new permies.com Thread Boost feature
https://permies.com/wiki/61482/Thread-Boost-feature
  • Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
Boost this thread!