paul has a new video  

 



visit the thread.

see the DVDs.

  • Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic

Ideas for this septic field....please help  RSS feed

 
Steve Stanek
Posts: 21
Location: Apex, North Carolina
chicken goat rabbit
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Help! I need ideas.... Help me come up with a good use for this area.

The photo below shows our septic field. Our soils are bad in the NC Triassic basin (only area were we could find land). So we had to use a non-conventional system. This resulted in much higher install cost and larger drainage field (150x40ft?). Our septic repair area would require even more costly system. So I am really freaked out about endangering the current drainage field.

It is very sloped too so cannot use for playing field for kids. I definitely don't want to to be just lawn.

Things I ruled out:

*Orchard mixed with berries: roots may clog pipes
*Run our chicken or rabbit tractors over it- worried about killing off vegetation and increasing nitrogen in area that may be high due to septic already.
*Garden area: Health hazard of crops due to septic. Too far from zone 1 (more neglect and plus deer will wipe anything out).

So guys, please give me some ideas on how I can use this area....
Thanks in advance,
steven
septic.JPG
[Thumbnail for septic.JPG]
 
Todd Parr
pollinator
Posts: 1421
Location: Wisconsin, zone 4
59
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I have a similar area, so I'll be following this.  All the same concerns you have.  Right now I'm leaning towards a native flower area for pollinator but I'm not set on the idea.
 
Bryant RedHawk
garden master
Posts: 3143
Location: Vilonia, Arkansas - Zone 7B/8A stoney, sandy loam soil pH 6.5
254
chicken dog forest garden hugelkultur hunting toxin-ectomy
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Taking into consideration your concerns and then looking at the actual local I would recommend using that space for a wildlife feed plot.
Planting crimson clover, alfalfa, brassicas, vetch, seven top turnip, etc. will give a high quality forage space for deer, turkey, rabbit, quail and most other game animals.
If you also planted some corn, beans and squashes you would have an excellent game animal attractor space which could allow you food as well as simply providing the wild life a wonderful space to use.

Do not plant red clover, it is quite a hazard for large animals like deer since it acts as a poison to them.
Sweet Yellow, Crimson, Dutch White are great clovers to use in a feed plot or a pasture.

As long as you make regular additions of biologicals to your septic system (every other month or even every month) then you will not have to worry about pathogens rising through the system, they will be eaten.
We use "Ridex" along with additions to the leach field of fungi slurries which include oyster mushroom hyphae that feed on some wood chips I've laid down over the entire leach field.


Redhawk
 
Jim Fry
Posts: 146
Location: Stone Garden Farm Richfield Twp., Ohio
13
  • Likes 2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
We use our similar area for pasture. Regulate how tall the grasses get by the number of animals you have, and by field rotation. We have La Mancha goats (because they are a rare breed here and give excellent milk) Jacobs sheep (also rare and supply good wool and meat) and we have Jersey milk cows for milk. They all do well in the area. We get some foot prints/divots, but its never been a problem because of slope and drainage. 
 
Steve Stanek
Posts: 21
Location: Apex, North Carolina
chicken goat rabbit
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Jim Fry wrote:We use our similar area for pasture. Regulate how tall the grasses get by the number of animals you have, and by field rotation. We have La Mancha goats (because they are a rare breed here and give excellent milk) Jacobs sheep (also rare and supply good wool and meat) and we have Jersey milk cows for milk. They all do well in the area. We get some foot prints/divots, but its never been a problem because of slope and drainage. 


Thanks Jim... got a question for you. What type of pasture plants are you growing for your goats? We have a few Nigerian Dwarfs that we could possibly cycle over there. But they are pretty picky eaters, don't care too much for grass. How did you get your La Manchas to forage instead of browse?
 
Travis Johnson
pollinator
Posts: 1511
164
books cat chicken duck rabbit transportation trees woodworking
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I would graze it. keep in mind the affluent from your household is going down and not up due to gravity. I would stay away from alfalfa as a crop of any type however as they put down a 20 foot tap root, and that includes my farm where ledge rock is everywhere. If it can drive its root into cracks in ledge, it will really find those tiny holes in your leach field pipes.

I will say this...holy smolies on size. I complained to the soil engineer on mine and it was 15 foot by 20.
 
Steve Stanek
Posts: 21
Location: Apex, North Carolina
chicken goat rabbit
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Bryant RedHawk wrote:Taking into consideration your concerns and then looking at the actual local I would recommend using that space for a wildlife feed plot.
Planting crimson clover, alfalfa, brassicas, vetch, seven top turnip, etc. will give a high quality forage space for deer, turkey, rabbit, quail and most other game animals.
If you also planted some corn, beans and squashes you would have an excellent game animal attractor space which could allow you food as well as simply providing the wild life a wonderful space to use.

Do not plant red clover, it is quite a hazard for large animals like deer since it acts as a poison to them.
Sweet Yellow, Crimson, Dutch White are great clovers to use in a feed plot or a pasture.

As long as you make regular additions of biologicals to your septic system (every other month or even every month) then you will not have to worry about pathogens rising through the system, they will be eaten.
We use "Ridex" along with additions to the leach field of fungi slurries which include oyster mushroom hyphae that feed on some wood chips I've laid down over the entire leach field.


Redhawk


Thanks for the details on plants and septic additives. This helps a lot.
 
Steve Stanek
Posts: 21
Location: Apex, North Carolina
chicken goat rabbit
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Travis Johnson wrote:I would graze it. keep in mind the affluent from your household is going down and not up due to gravity. I would stay away from alfalfa as a crop of any type however as they put down a 20 foot tap root, and that includes my farm where ledge rock is everywhere. If it can drive its root into cracks in ledge, it will really find those tiny holes in your leach field pipes.

I will say this...holy smolies on size. I complained to the soil engineer on mine and it was 15 foot by 20.


They cleared more than just the leech field. But it is very large...I think it has to do with it being a low pressure system and soil type in area.
 
Jim Wineteer
Posts: 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Mine is a chicken garden I only moved to my place two years ago.  But it had a drainfield failure and add-on drainfield repair before us.  So it's a huge concern for me.

Its planted mostly in cover crop, from a mixed bag locally appropriate from the local co op.  Wheat, clover, vetch; stuff like that.  I agree with the alfalfa warning and I wouldn't do any perennials that have that type of deep roots. I'll do sunflowers, corn, squash, pumpkin for them too as I get around to it; but so far it's just been grasses and legumes to get the soil going.  The 16 birds  get access at about 6 at night and act like they love it then put themselves back in the run when the light gets low.  That's 830 for now and they aren't tearing up a similar sized spot because they don't get to dwell on it long enough.


 
A day job? In an office? My worst nightmare! Comfort me tiny ad!
Permaculture Playing Cards by Paul Wheaton and Alexander Ojeda
https://permies.com/wiki/57503/digital-market/digital-market/Permaculture-Playing-Cards-Paul-Wheaton
  • Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
Boost this thread!