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Tree ID

 
Posts: 68
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What is this beautiful tree?
I was told it's a chestnut and it needs a companion.

IMG_2869.JPG
What is this beautiful tree?
What is this beautiful tree?
 
pollinator
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Those look like compound leaves, so it's not a chestnut. Might be a pecan.
 
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Location: Officially Zone 7b, according to personal obsevations I live in 7a, SW Tennessee
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From the visible features, I'd guess pecan or walnut.
More pictures would be helpful in getting a more definative answer.
I suggest...
Close up of the leaves-are the edges smooth or toothed(serrated)
Leaves, somewhat further away, to show the structure of the branches the leaves grow on
Close up of the tree bark
Close up of the developing fruit (nuts) or flower structure

If you are in the northern hemisphere, the nuts should be clearly visible at this time of year. Pecan and walnut blooms are also easily seen from the ground, though they look like dangly oddities, rather than flowers. In USDA zone 7 they bloom in March, I think. I have not yet seen chestnut blooms, so I cannot comment on them.
 
Laurent Voulzy
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Here are the closeups.
IMG_2881.JPG
closeup of bark
closeup of bark
IMG_2878.JPG
closeup of leaves
closeup of leaves
IMG_2879.JPG
leaf branches
leaf branches
IMG_2880.JPG
leaf
leaf
 
pollinator
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Location: Wisconsin, zone 4
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It's easy to tell walnut trees because if you smash a leaf and smell it, it smells really citrus-y.
 
Laurent Voulzy
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Todd Parr wrote:It's easy to tell walnut trees because if you smash a leaf and smell it, it smells really citrus-y.


I just crushed a leaf, it doesn't smell citrusy.
 
Todd Parr
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Location: Wisconsin, zone 4
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Laurent Voulzy wrote:

Todd Parr wrote:It's easy to tell walnut trees because if you smash a leaf and smell it, it smells really citrus-y.


I just crushed a leaf, it doesn't smell citrusy.



Not Walnut then  Pecan seems a good guess.  I don't know any tricks for being sure about that one though.
 
Joylynn Hardesty
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