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Tips on propagating lemon balm

 
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I am going to try snipping a few newly grown stems of lemon balm and plan on transplanting them to experiment whether or not they will grow into their own plant. Has anyone tried this before or have any tips to provide?
 
gardener
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Location: Virginia (zone 7)
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Hi Savanna and welcome to Permies! I apologise that I only just now saw your post.

Lemon balm is easy to propagate. I  planted some for my sister at her house. Her husband now cusses me because it pops up everywhere. Mine, at my house, stayed a little better behaved (well contained). I don't know why. Here's a link that will help you with propagation of most soft wood cuttings. Mother Earth Living
 
steward
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Location: Maine (zone 5)
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I usually save seed from mine to establish in areas where I need it.  If you don't want it to spread, I'd suggest not letting it flower or lay along the ground where it can set roots.  I have the stuff everywhere but I like it because it is a good insect repellent as well as being a good polyculture buddy for fruit trees.  When I mow it around the rock walls of my herb garden, the smell is pretty awesome.  

Other herbs that have done the same thing for me are oregano, mountain mint, sage, thyme and camomile.    
 
pollinator
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I have trouble stopping it spreading

David
 
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Location: USDA zone 6a/5b
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cut as low as you can(possibly getting some roots) and place in a container/new area, mulch well to keep moisture!  If it is the Fall/Autumn season where you are then you should have very little trouble keeping moisture and as everyone has said it is an easy plant to propagate as it is in the mint family i believe and mints are known to spread really well!
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