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Started growing honey locusts in my house, and they're growing faster than I thought. What next?

 
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Location: Quebec
forest garden
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I started about 50 honey locusts in my house about 10 days ago and they're already growing fast (and the germination rate is incredible). They're each in cells from a cell tray (SureRoots) with 2" width and 5" depth.

My goal was to plant them outdoors in the spring, but I realize they might become heavily constrained by the pot size, but is that really an issue? Would the trees end up dying if they spend several months in those pots? Will they have a hard time adjusting to the "infinite" size of land, when they've been so used to being constrained in those pots?
 
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Jerome,

I have planted quite a few. They are not picky at all. If they get rootbound prune the top and do your best to detangle the roots.

Once they get to about 6" high you can also make them dormant for the remainder of the winter by gradually exposing them to lower temps and eventually freezing. Then just neglect them until they are ready to plant.

 
Jerome Lee
Posts: 12
Location: Quebec
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Tj Jefferson wrote:Jerome,

I have planted quite a few. They are not picky at all. If they get rootbound prune the top and do your best to detangle the roots.

Once they get to about 6" high you can also make them dormant for the remainder of the winter by gradually exposing them to lower temps and eventually freezing. Then just neglect them until they are ready to plant.



Thanks for your answer. What do you think will happen if I let them grow as is? Trying to go for the least effort approach. If it doesn't work out I can always start new ones in March or so.
 
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