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5 Easy Perennials  RSS feed

 
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Location: Ozark County, Missouri
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Wandering around our land today and wanted to highlight and share some easy perennials (most not even a year old) growing on our homestead in late fall (in zone 6b). These all required little care and yielded well this year!



In case you can't watch the vid, we profiled Watercress, Sunroot, Skirret, Nettles & Erba Stella.

What are some of your favorite perennials up and active now that are easy and productive?
 
pollinator
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Location: Anjou ,France
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Black current , Its a must have here
 
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Sorrel, wild violets, ground ivy, sedum telephium, horseradish young leaves ,black currant young leaves, all tasty surprises for in salads. Strawberry, framboise, red currant. Horseradish roots, topinambour/sunroot, and herbs, do they count? I'd say, mint, citron melisse, rosemary, lavender ,thyme and sage for teas ,balms and hydrosols.
 
gardener
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We have lots of wild berries and other fruits. Swiss Chard is not supposed to be perennial, but it sheds enough seed, that I have carried it over for several seasons in a row.

The most useful and probably the item with the most economic potential that grows naturally at my place, is salal berries. They are a natural appetite suppressant. The only cultivation necessary to get plenty of salal berries, is to trim the overstory, if it starts to shade them out.
 
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Speaking of perennials. Does anybody know if I can grow my sea Buckthorn indoors in a container this winter? It was a sucker planted in the garden last spring and it did not thrive. I would like to put the little stub in a container for the winter and replant it in march. Any thoughts.
 
pollinator
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Location: Wisconsin, zone 4
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Guy Zindel wrote:Speaking of perennials. Does anybody know if I can grow my sea Buckthorn indoors in a container this winter? It was a sucker planted in the garden last spring and it did not thrive. I would like to put the little stub in a container for the winter and replant it in march. Any thoughts.



What climate are you in?  I can't imagine living anywhere that it won't over-winter just fine in the ground outside.
 
Guy Zindel
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I'm at 5400' in a northern Utah valley that routinely sees 4-6 feet of snow on the ground.  My hope is it will get a chance to develop more fully during the next 4 months.
 
wren haffner
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Guy Zindel wrote:I'm at 5400' in a northern Utah valley that routinely sees 4-6 feet of snow on the ground.  My hope is it will get a chance to develop more fully during the next 4 months.



Sounds like it could use some babying to get those roots strong for next year. Couldn't hurt to bring it inside.
 
wren haffner
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Thanks for all the responses! Yes I agree garden herbs do count! As do "reseeding cold hardy annuals", I'd say. Along those lines mizuno, kale and arugula come in strong on our homestead.

I was interested to see currant listed twice (we have a few varieties in their first year so no fruit yet). Are you all still having fruit on at this time of year?
 
Guy Zindel
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Pretty much what I was thinking, my biggest concern was basically would it screw them up to not go totally dormant. Thoughts?
 
Todd Parr
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Guy Zindel wrote:I'm at 5400' in a northern Utah valley that routinely sees 4-6 feet of snow on the ground.  My hope is it will get a chance to develop more fully during the next 4 months.



They are good down to zone 2.  That much snow over them will help them rather than hurt.  They won't have any problem at all surviving outside.  Mine have survived winters with and without snow and temps down to -30F without wind chill.  I would be more concerned about them not getting their dormant period, as you said.
 
wren haffner
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Guy Zindel wrote:Pretty much what I was thinking, my biggest concern was basically would it screw them up to not go totally dormant. Thoughts?



Guy, they're hardy zone 2-8 so if you're concerned about dormancy needs (I read that they need at least 300 chill hours), it seems these guys are very versatile. You could always put it in a garage, unheated polytunnel or colder section of the house to give it a lower temp to mimic zone 8, but still allow it to be babyed a bit.
 
Guy Zindel
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Thanks, I think I'll pot them up and let them "chill" on the back porch till mid Jan, I'll bring them inside then.
 
Hugo Morvan
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I was interested to see currant listed twice (we have a few varieties in their first year so no fruit yet). Are you all still having fruit on at this time of year?


No, currants do their trick in spring, May i think. The berries don't ripen all at the same time, so you'll be checking, when they loose their gloss they're best. Although when you have lots that's difficult to spend time at. You've got to prune them as well in winter. Which leaves you with lots of cuttings for propagation. I've put 50 or something around a neighbours veggie patch last year, when the new shoot it's as wide as a pen, stick them in the ground, almost all took, and i still had cuttings left to give to another friend just starting a garden. 
 
David Livingston
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I live not far from Hugo and currents are one of my big and to be honest free crops  its so easy to propagate . I only cut them every four years . I have four groups of about Fifteen plants and cut back one group each year very hard .  Just cut a pencil sized stick , make a hole with a spade , drop in the stick about three quarters in ,firm in with your foot . thats it come back a year later to trans plant
 
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