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Transplanting winter uproots  RSS feed

 
Posts: 159
Location: Mason Cty, WA
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I dug up the following in December, zone 8b, and think I should wait till after last frost to transplant them. Never planted like this so seems wise to check.

Comfrey roots
Elderberry cane
Groundnut tubers
Mashua tubers
Yacon tubers
Sunchokes (eh these guys will grow even if I drive over them)
Kale

Till then I'm keeping them covered, but at outside temperature (28-50), and of course MOIST. Everything here is moist. Am I doing the right thing? Thanks!
 
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Location: Cache Valley, zone 4b, Irrigated, 9" rain in badlands.
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I don't grow all of those species, so can't address their winter hardiness. At my place comfrey, elderberry, and sunroots are winter hardy, so I'd put them into their new location to overwinter. Some varieties of kale are winter-hardy at my place. Other varieties aren't.  In Zone 8b, I'd expect pretty much all kale to be winter hardy.
 
Fredy Perlman
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Thanks John. So as a guideline, anything that is winter hardy in my zone is better off in the ground than in the shipping container, where neither rodents nor frost can get to it.

After planting them I'm also mulching the hell out of em with maple leaves and alder chips. For that added frost protection, mushroom companionship and fertility
 
Joseph Lofthouse
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At my place, things that are winter hardy tend to be safer in the ground than they are in my care and keeping. I am inconsistent and unreliable, and so is my family. Hard to depend on us to plant things out at the right time, or to keep rodents out of a shipping container, etc. Plants got along just fine outdoors in the winter before humans invented agriculture.

I dislike mulches and composts, cause they tend to be rot inducing. And in the spring they keep the soil cold, which induces even more rotting.
 
Fredy Perlman
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Thanks Joseph. Reassured in part by your posts, I planted out the kale (what was i going to do, keep it in its earthen clumps in a bucket?). I'll have to eat most of the leaves or the deer will as soon as I turn my back, they're even eating blackberry leaves now which I welcome.

I planted 3 of the comfrey root pieces, and was thrilled to see they're already leafing out. Keeping in mind that I am never moving them from where they are.

Plants *did* get along just fine but a lot of humans' are pathetic hybrids with nonadaptive characteristics, reliant on our handholding, yes? I don't think that's what I'm growing though...my interest in Andean vegetables comes in part from their vigor. Most of these things have been irrepressible in their first year.

What is this about mulches and composts? Rot is a big issue here, it ruined all my black Spanish radishes last fall. And I just planted the kale in broadforked native soil, each plant receiving a shovelful of topsoil, a layer of maple leaves, and some alder chips. Of course, you're in 4b and I'm in 8b, it might come down to that. You get 9" of rain? I get 66".
 
Joseph Lofthouse
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I also add 12" of irrigation during the summer months.
 
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