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What do you do with your excess yield?  RSS feed

 
Dave Miller
pollinator
Posts: 416
Location: Zone 8b: SW Washington
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This winter I started a bunch of perennial permie plants from seed indoors, with the intention of including them in my food forest backyard. Well the germination rate was way higher than what I was expecting, so I have about 10 times the plants that I have room for in my yard.

Since they are from seed I don't know if the fruit (mostly berries) will be as good as the parent, but I'm hoping it will be close.

Anyway, I am debating whether to repot the extras into 1-gallon pots or just compost them.  If I repot them, I wouldn't want to sell them but I wouldn't mind trading them for something, or just giving them away - but to whom?

The plants are relatively unusual around here (aronia, goji), plus some beautiful lupines.  Probably about 50 plants total.  They are about 4" tall now.

What would you do with these?

And more generally, what do you do with your "excess yield"?
 
Leila Rich
steward
Posts: 3999
Location: Wellington, New Zealand. Temperate, coastal, sandy, windy,
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Do you have a local Transition Towns, permaculture group or a similar outfit, where people might understand the value of the plants you're offering?
Our TT has a group email function which I've used to offer free stuff and also solicit advice.
There's always guerilla gardening...
 
tel jetson
steward
Posts: 3381
Location: woodland, washington
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with fruit seedlings, it can be useful to plant a whole bunch to see which turn out to produce good fruit.  if you don't have room for something like that, maybe you've got a pal close by who does.  maybe give somebody the seedlings in exchange for growing them out long enough to select for good characteristics.

you could also just plant all of them, and gradually thin them out as they start crowding.

seems a shame to compost them, though.  at the very least you could throw them on free cycle or craigslist.  depending on what part of SW Washington you're in and what exactly it is you've got, I might be willing to make a trip to get some plants.

as far as what to do with excess... haven't really encountered that issue yet.  what isn't eaten immediately is sold, given to family and friends, or preserved.  doesn't seem to be much extra hanging around as of yet.  seems like a good problem to have, though.
 
Jordan Lowery
pollinator
Posts: 1528
Location: zone 7
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i could think of at least 30 people who i could unload plants on whenever i want. and they gladly accept them all.
 
Mary James
Posts: 145
Location: NW MT Zones 4/5 Rollins Mt
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Excess Yield,
With my plants I always start more then enough to share.We teach classes to those who are just learning to garden , many of whom use the local food banks.So I donate any extras to those I teach who cannot afford.
  I also used to be in a trading network which was a wonderful way to meet new gardeners with special interest,you may think about that, it can be a wonderful experience , in my old gardens we had plants from every state from trades.. It had cool memories.
  With produce we do the same thing Our garden is a memorial garden which we teach many uses from,, Anything that we do not use and when everyone is sick of the extras , the freezers are full, we are out of canning jars, etc also is donated to the local food bank..
 
Brenda Groth
pollinator
Posts: 4437
Location: North Central Michigan
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i have both donated and sold excess yields..esp berries..(sold) and plants (given)..when I first got started here a lot of my plants were donated to me so I felt that donating to others was my way of giving back..

if I have the means I also enjoy putting things by for winter (canning, drying, freezing, preserving, etc.)..and sometimes I do this for others as well ..gifts..

several years I gave elderberry jelly to my family members for christmas gifts..(then I found out a few of them didn't really care for it..so I stopped doing that)..I love it and my mom does too, so now I'm more careful to give to those that appreciate my odd preserves..
 
Jeff Hodgins
Posts: 207
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You could just find a forggoten corner of the country side and plant them there, My brother has grapes growing in openings in the forest and such.
 
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