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Will air-layering a grafted tree above the graft produce genes of the rootstock, scion, or both?  RSS feed

 
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If I have an apple or citrus tree that is grafted onto a root stock, and I air-layer a grafted branch or a branch ABOVE the graft (not a sucker), will the air-layered plant be a clone of the rootstock, the scion, or will it have genes from both since it is forming new roots while still attached to the rootstock?

I hope this makes sense --- just spent hours googling this to no avail.
 
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It will be a clone of the scion/graft.  This makes sense right, the grafted part of the tree is creating roots from its own cells.
 
Ryan A Miller
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Yeah it totally makes sense.  I guess I was overthinking it, since with air-layering the xylem and pith are still attached and what not I was thinking some rootstock genes might hybridize with the scion or something, idk haha thank you!
 
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The roots normally produce the growth/master hormone for the top part of the tree thus inducing earlier fruiting and dwarfing. The hormones might travel and even affect the gene expression of the top part of the tree but sir layering will not give you a hybrid of the rootstock and graft.

I do however find budspurt interesting
 
Ryan A Miller
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S Bengi wrote:The roots normally produce the growth/master hormone for the top part of the tree thus inducing earlier fruiting and dwarfing. The hormones might travel and even affect the gene expression of the top part of the tree but sir layering will not give you a hybrid of the rootstock and graft.

I do however find budspurt interesting



Thank you, clearly put for me.  Budspurt?
 
S Bengi
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https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sport_(botany)

In botany, a sport or bud sport, traditionally called lusus,[1] is a part of a plant that shows morphological differences from the rest of the plant.
Sports may differ by foliage shape or color, flowers, or branch structure.

An example of a bud sport is the nectarine, at least some of which developed as a bud sport from peaches.
Other common fruits resulting from a sport mutation are the red Anjou pear and the 'Pink Lemonade' lemon which is a sport of the "Eureka" lemon.[3]
 
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S Bengi wrote:The roots normally produce the growth/master hormone for the top part of the tree thus inducing earlier fruiting and dwarfing. 



I always understood that a weak root system was responsible for dwarfing. Can you share some more info rmation about growth inhibiting factors from the root stock?
 
S Bengi
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Most adenine-type cytokinins are synthesized in roots.
Cytokinins (CK) are a class of plant growth substances (phytohormones) that promote cell division, or cytokinesis, in plant roots and shoots. They are involved primarily in cell growth and differentiation, but also affect apical dominance, axillary bud growth, and leaf senescence. Folke Skoog discovered their effects using coconut milk in the 1940s at the University of Wisconsin–Madison.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cytokinin
 
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Back in my college days (agriculture) in 1982 I remember reading about tomatoes grafted onto pot plants, and the tomatoes showed the same side effects as the rootstock. Just interesting...
 
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