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Slow moving semi-seasonal spring

 
                    
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My property is fairly sloped, down to a sort of maple swamp. On the way is some edge property which looks out over (south facing) wetland meadow type, with a seasonal stream along the edge. I live in a fairly wet place so water is not a prime concern. I intend to have fruit trees all along this stream but I feel like i have some options of how to handle the stream.

I dont necessarily have to do anything with it. But it looks a little overly fertilized (i havent fertilized anything) when it gets stagnant up top so I thought of maybe trying to move the water along faster, and I also thought of making a pool at some part (not swimming pool a pool at the top part would have readily available water for an annual garden over there. 

I'm a little concerned where the extra nutrients are coming from and im basing that on algae.

If I pooled it say at the bottom right before the swamp I could make a little pond and I could consider a little pump system and send the water back up to the top of the property or stream when the spring dries up a bit. for either aesthetic or utilitarian purposes. I figure since a good deal of water in the surrounding area ends up in my little swamp any water i pump back up will remain on my property.

Part of why I feel as if i should alter the path of the water a bit is that its not always clearly defined. It might save me some space to dig it out (and berm it up) a bit, but i run the risk of causing to much pooling if i dont do it correctly. i probably dont have the time to really alter the slope.

I thought of sinking a rubbermaid container into the ground with holes in it up by the annual bed to allow the water to collect into it. Although im not sure about the danger in using a container like that.

One other factor is that there are currently some trees shading this area that will be removed. (a whole other discussion on aspen removal, im up for the task, big tooth aspen really does have some beautiful bark.) i wonder if the removal of these will greatly alter the dryness of that stream

Not trying to be wordy, and its not really a pressing matter i got some other things to do. but i find myself thinking about it a bit. anyone got any sources on this topic?
 
Tyler Ludens
pollinator
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Location: Central Texas USA Latitude 30 Zone 8
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Not sure how "developed" you want to go with the spring.  I'm looking for some references on how to get a spring to run better or to form a pool, etc.

http://www.sungravity.com/bulletin__3.html

http://www.prlog.org/10200081-natural-water-source-enhancement-new-spring-development-manual-step-by-step-guide.html

There was an article I saw awhile ago about how to get a feeble spring to produce a better flow, but darn it I can't find it again! 
 
John Polk
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Location: Currently in Lake Stevens, WA. Home in Spokane
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Water rights laws vary from state/state, but you should look into your area's laws.  If somebody downstream from you has deeded water rights to your stream, you could find yourself owing them a lot of money for "their" water that you denied them from using.  Just a thought.
 
                    
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John Polk wrote:
Water rights laws vary from state/state, but you should look into your area's laws.  If somebody downstream from you has deeded water rights to your stream, you could find yourself owing them a lot of money for "their" water that you denied them from using.  Just a thought.



i think this is highly unlikely, based on my sistuation. there is not nearly enough water exiting my property for someone to be expecting it. i live in a wet valley and at a valley in that valley. on top of that there are real streams and brooks around me not my sloping meadow and eventual swamp.

thanks tho ill keep it in mind.

i dont much wanna be another who makes a lake out of his swamp to the detriment of my ecosystem. ive always enjoyed swampland i am only really considering altering the stream before it lands in the swamp and the swamp so far as changing some of its overstory and understory. why should it have no cottonwoods? not an entirely useful species. but i have no need for a million red maples aspen and the occasiona white pine getting ready to be flooded out
 
                    
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H Ludi Tyler wrote:
Not sure how "developed" you want to go with the spring.  I'm looking for some references on how to get a spring to run better or to form a pool, etc.

http://www.sungravity.com/bulletin__3.html

http://www.prlog.org/10200081-natural-water-source-enhancement-new-spring-development-manual-step-by-step-guide.html

There was an article I saw awhile ago about how to get a feeble spring to produce a better flow, but darn it I can't find it again! 


thanks for the sources il check them out. but now i gotta get working for the day. hmmm protect plants or plant potatoes and chestnuts? finish the hugel? call the fence guy? UGH someone send me laborers!!!
 
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