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Permaculture acreage for sale, Saskatchewan, Canada

 
Posts: 12
forest garden bee homestead
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Permaculture acreage for sale just north of Prince Albert, Saskatchewan, Canada. $330,000, we are accepting offers. 8.06 beautiful acres. 2 houses, one has grey water system all set up outside. House on the hill gets a lot of sun and could be solar powered. Please contact for all details on houses. 6 acres are fenced for livestock with bush on three sides and a strip dow the middle (silvopasture). The pasture has wild roses, saskatoons, chokecherries, currants, gooseberries, high bush cranberries. 1 acre market garden, early food forest, Swales on sloped area every three rows. Fruit trees and bushes include sea buckthorn, hazelnut, apple, pear, apricot, haskaps, etc. Zone one is planted with all different herbs, currants, mints, etc. Nursery beds with young grafted fruit trees. Spot dug for walipini/Cirtus in the snow type greenhouse.  Pretty quiet place. There are two farmer's markets close by as well as three lakes. We have put in three small ponds and several huguelculture beds. We are currently lambing this month and will be doubling or tripling our sheep flock. We have outgrown our present farm  for our grass fed livestock as well as we trial hardy nut and fruit trees and need more space for growing large numbers of trees. We have had geese, ducks, quail, chickens, sheep, goats, horses, and a cow here. Lots of wildlife in the area. A pair of bald eagles nest up the road. This property has been chemical free for the past five years and we have been rotational intensive grazing in the pasture as well as using aged manure to fertilize the garden area.
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pasture and trees
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Sheep grazing
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Barn
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older house
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seed starting windows
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horse and sheep
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Geeses
 
gardener & author
Posts: 2098
Location: Manitoba, Canada
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Hi A,

As someone who grew up in Manitoba I'm not sure I could make the switch to Sask and I have plans for my own property here. I am curious though (and I'm guessing others might be too), of the $330,000 asking price how much would you estimate is a result of all of your well-developed systems? If all of your systems were removed and it was just bare land with the same buildings, how much different would your asking price be? I think this would be really helpful info for those considering flipping properties permaculture style.

Good luck selling and all the best to you,


Shawn
 
A Crossman
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forest garden bee homestead
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Shawn Klassen-Koop wrote:Hi A,

As someone who grew up in Manitoba I'm not sure I could make the switch to Sask and I have plans for my own property here. I am curious though (and I'm guessing others might be too), of the $330,000 asking price how much would you estimate is a result of all of your well-developed systems? If all of your systems were removed and it was just bare land with the same buildings, how much different would your asking price be? I think this would be really helpful info for those considering flipping properties permaculture style.

Good luck selling and all the best to you,


Shawn



Hi Shawn,
This price is comparable to other properties in the area that do not have any permaculture systems. We put a lot of work into renovating both houses.  1 or 2 acre acreages go for $280-300,000. Buyers like fencing and fruit trees but the banks like to only go by the house. Southern Saskatchewan or farther out from the main cities are less expensive but depending on area, you may not have many customers to sell your excess to. There are some properties that are available south for a lot less that the houses are condemned or near to that but then you have to consider how much will it cost to build a house or renovate a house (complete plumbing and electrical) unless you have access to a yurt and you can get it approved by the RM. I have a friend up the road who bought bare land and went through a big hassle with the RM to build a rammed earth house. The RM doesn't have a problem with composting toilets or greywater systems but the main shelter for housing for people they want plans approved by an architect.  In this RM, you can build anything for agriculture, but you need a permit to add on to a house. We considered buying bare land and living in a tent (pretty cold in early spring in SK) but have to have a water source for the animals, some kind of shelter at night for the livestock. We are working toward solar but that is a big expense.
 
pollinator
Posts: 231
Location: Sask, Canada - Zone 3b
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Up north the land is really nice. I'm only an hour or so south-west of PA and that kind of grass in the sheep&horse photos doesn't exist around here.

Prince Albert is only an hour and a half from Saskatoon (pop:300,000). The price of the property sounds like a deal with all that permaculture equity. I've never heard of apricots being that far north - impressive :)

Just to build on Shawn's question, how long did it take you to get the property to it's current point? You mentioned 5 years of chemical-free, but I wasn't sure if that was how long you'd been on the property.

Hope you find a buyer soon!
 
A Crossman
Posts: 12
forest garden bee homestead
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Jarret Hynd wrote:Up north the land is really nice. I'm only an hour or so south-west of PA and that kind of grass in the sheep&horse photos doesn't exist around here.

Prince Albert is only an hour and a half from Saskatoon (pop:300,000). The price of the property sounds like a deal with all that permaculture equity. I've never heard of apricots being that far north - impressive :)

Just to build on Shawn's question, how long did it take you to get the property to it's current point? You mentioned 5 years of chemical-free, but I wasn't sure if that was how long you'd been on the property.

Hope you find a buyer soon!


It took two years to get the grass looking like that. Grazing rotation, moving every day or two. The livestock ate all the dead stuff down first so the grass could actually grow. The pasture land may not have had chemicals on it before we bought it but the market garden area had been used to grow grain. It took three years to get the grain to stop growing in the market garden and we have been growing topsoil every year in the garden through using composted manure and mulch. The soil doesn't blow away like the neighbouring land.
I am growing Manchurian apricots but will be leaving them behind. I am getting Capilano apricots this year that I will be taking with me.
The picture is tomatoes and squash are in a hoophouse on top of the hill so they don't get wind damaged. Just composted manure and the tomatoes grow until we have a really hard frost.
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hoophouse full of tomatoes and squash
 
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