• Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic

evan's ant village log  RSS feed

 
Wyatt Barnes
Posts: 312
7
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I like to sit quietly and listen to the world around me for short periods of time during the day especially if I am involved in a job using noisy machinery. When refueling a chainsaw or woodsplitter I almost always take off my hearing protection and sit on a block of wood to listen for a minute or two. Not only does it give me a quick breather but it allows me to check the world around me through sound. I don't like being sound blinded for extended periods of time by loud noises near me
 
evan l pierce
Lab Ant
pollinator
Posts: 748
Location: ava, ant village
618
chicken duck forest garden greening the desert hugelkultur hunting solar wofati woodworking
  • Likes 7
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Day 22

The fence was inspected and after a couple rounds of fixing and perfecting, the bounty was secured. The latches on the gates went through multiple iterations before arriving at this design. I'm liable to opt for something a little simpler when I build the gates for my fence, but there's something to be said for a swinging wooden latch that can be easily opened from both sides.

After that was all done, I went on a hike up one of the nearby mountains. There was beautiful wildlife to observe on the way up, and then amazing views to enjoy from the peak.
20150429_183240.jpg
[Thumbnail for 20150429_183240.jpg]
latchtastic
20150429_192913.jpg
[Thumbnail for 20150429_192913.jpg]
purty purple orchid-y flower
20150429_193427.jpg
[Thumbnail for 20150429_193427.jpg]
pictures didn't do it justice
 
evan l pierce
Lab Ant
pollinator
Posts: 748
Location: ava, ant village
618
chicken duck forest garden greening the desert hugelkultur hunting solar wofati woodworking
  • Likes 7
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Day 23

Got some work done on building raised beds for my garden today. I started digging out the paths and piling the soil on top of a thin layer of brush and woody debris. I intend to repeat this process at least once more for each bed, and mix in some old cow manure, then start planting seeds more systematically.

Nick has been here on the labs for the past week or so, and he's been super helpful. We've been bouncing lots of ideas off each other, and we worked together on the fence project, which made it go way faster. He's off on yet another adventure tomorrow, but today he got a light workout helping to move logs for my wofati. Look at this dude: he's a Norwegian beast!

Climbed another mountain today too. Sure is pretty country.
20150430_120409.jpg
[Thumbnail for 20150430_120409.jpg]
shovel ready
20150430_120758.jpg
[Thumbnail for 20150430_120758.jpg]
human log arch
20150430_170303.jpg
[Thumbnail for 20150430_170303.jpg]
montana
 
Adrien Lapointe
steward
Posts: 3430
Location: Kingston, Canada (USDA zone 5a)
206
chicken dog food preservation forest garden fungi tiny house toxin-ectomy trees woodworking
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
What is your plan for your wofati?
 
evan l pierce
Lab Ant
pollinator
Posts: 748
Location: ava, ant village
618
chicken duck forest garden greening the desert hugelkultur hunting solar wofati woodworking
  • Likes 7
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Day 24

I think I've probably come up with at least a dozen different designs for my shelter since moving here. Squares, rectangles, sheds, gables, a-frames, pie-shapes, etc. Some made more sense than others, but in general the aim has been towards radical simplicity and ease of construction. My most recent thoughts on design are looking sort of octagonal, strangely enough.

An octagon may not seem as simple as other shapes, but a couple things it has going for it is fairly short wall spans relative to interior space, (meaning I'll be able to easily build the walls by myself,) and also the possibility of views in all four directions without compromising on earth-berming. The site I have picked out for it is basically a hill top with excellent southern exposure, so drainage and passive solar seem pretty optimized, even with as symmetrical a design as I'm planning.

As Paul has so kindly agreed to let me use some of the already peeled and dried logs, I've been able to quickly accumulate a decent little stack without yet having to resort to the tedium of debarking. That said, I expect I will still need to break out the drawknife before long. But today, the bowsaw was the tool of choice, and I cut 30+ dried logs to quite manageable 7 ft lengths.
20150501_165959.jpg
[Thumbnail for 20150501_165959.jpg]
bowsaw action
20150501_201758.jpg
[Thumbnail for 20150501_201758.jpg]
fat stacks
20150430_165418.jpg
[Thumbnail for 20150430_165418.jpg]
wild strawberry blossom
 
Dan Boone
gardener
Posts: 1787
Location: Central Oklahoma (zone 7a)
195
forest garden trees woodworking
  • Likes 5
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Evan, it may amuse you to hear that I grew up in a large octagonal cabin that my family built in 1976 in Alaska. My father went with the octagonal design for exactly your "short logs" reason: he couldn't find another way to build for a family of six with logs he could lift himself with only the help of his two teenaged daughters.
 
Wyatt Barnes
Posts: 312
7
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
A circle maximizes surface area with a fixed amount of perimeter available, one of the reasons a corral is round. An octagon seems to be the chosen shape for circle lovers with access to solid straight material. I think it is a good choice.
 
Michael Cox
Posts: 1667
Location: Kent, UK - Zone 8
54
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I saw a structure/single room dwelling once that was made as a hexagon. The roof was made by stacking the interlocking logs a little tighter in each level. There were no fastenings in the whole thing apparently - it was all notches and pressure holding it in place.
 
Jay C. White Cloud
Posts: 2413
46
  • Likes 2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Hello Evan,

I have lived in several Hogan in my life. They afford some positive effects of both the round and square shapes of architecture. Good to see you building again...

traditional Hogan

 
Mariamne Ingalls
pollinator
Posts: 166
Location: NE Ohio (Zone 6a, on the cusp of 6b) 38.7" annual precip
27
  • Likes 2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
evan l pierce wrote:Day 22

...purty purple orchid-y flower


Hi Evan -

I think this is a calypso orchid.
Growiser website - see down the page a bit...

All best wishes,
Mariamne
 
Chad Sentman
Posts: 189
11
bee books chicken duck fish forest garden hugelkultur solar urban
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Regarding deerproofing:

I recently read about a method which I found amusing, though perhaps a tad cruel.

Run an electric wire around your perimeter. Every so often, hang a bit of tin foil from the wire. put a dab of peanut butter on each.
 
Miles Flansburg
steward
Posts: 4023
Location: Zones 2-4 Wyoming and 4-5 Colorado
172
bee books forest garden fungi greening the desert hugelkultur
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Oh man Evan I am doing the happy dance right now ! Thanks for doing an octagon log home ! That is exactly what I want to do as it seems the easiest quickest, way to go. Please take lots of pictures of that and tells us how it goes!
 
jacque greenleaf
pollinator
Posts: 489
Location: Burton, WA (USDA zone 8, Sunset zone 5) - old hippie heaven
2
  • Likes 4
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
First yellow flower - Fritillaria pudica

Second yellow flower is definitely an Erythronium, most likely grandiflorum - http://www.montana.plant-life.org/species/erythro_gran.htm

I'm hopeless at bugs, but your beetle looks like a ground beetle, a garden-friendly predator of slug eggs - http://insects.about.com/od/beetles/p/carabidae.htm

April 19, blue flower, looks like a viola

April 21, purple flower, Dodecatheon, not sure which species, common name shooting star

April 22, little white flower, Lithophragma, woodland or prairie star

April 27, white flower, Trillium

April 28, shrub, looks like an Amelenchior, common names serviceberry or saskatoonberry or shad berry - fruit is edible, pectin source for making jam/jelly with tastier fruit

April 29, yup, Calypso bulbosa


Great fence, I'm jealous!



 
evan l pierce
Lab Ant
pollinator
Posts: 748
Location: ava, ant village
618
chicken duck forest garden greening the desert hugelkultur hunting solar wofati woodworking
  • Likes 4
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Day 25

I'm so grateful for all the kind words, helpful advice and information, and just all the awesome support I've been receiving from the permies community. Two pieces of mail addressed to me arrived today. Charles Kleff sent me some Lagenaria seeds! I can't wait to grow these funky gourds! And S. Meyer sent me some cash money! Wow! Thanks y'all!

I made some progress on both my gardens and the logs for my wofati today, but when the sun was high in the sky, I found some shade and worked on carving a cup out of a block of basswood. I still have a long way to go. Both the wood and the mocotaugan, or crooked knife, came from Brian Brown, who stopped by the labs for a few days to fix all the things. Brian is a total badass and has all kinds of mad primitive skills. He also gave me some other sweet Proenneke tools and shared some of his knowledge and experience. Thanks again, Brian!
20150502_180003.jpg
[Thumbnail for 20150502_180003.jpg]
mocotaugan
20150502_180424.jpg
[Thumbnail for 20150502_180424.jpg]
basswood cup in progress
20150423_104825.jpg
[Thumbnail for 20150423_104825.jpg]
some kind of growie
 
Rhys Firth
Posts: 120
5
  • Likes 3
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Personally I would be burning a cup out, now you have made a start on a hollow, place a few coals from a fire there and huff gently to burn and char it deeper. tip out the cooled coals and replace with new fresh hot coals occasionally. You don't want to BURN the wood up, just char and smoulder it away, so don't use too many or too big.
 
Hans Quistorff
pollinator
Posts: 781
Location: Longbranch, WA
44
chicken goat rabbit solar tiny house wofati
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Looks like you ha lupen. Recent article about flour made from the seeds causing allergic reaction in people with peanut sensitivity.
 
Jon Stoski
Posts: 12
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I wonder, have you thought about digging a root cellar? I have been thinking about doing what you are doing now, starting from scratch, planting your garden and protecting the yield as much as possible. So far you are rocking it, IMO. It is early days yet, but since you are also working on shelter now, have you considered space for food storage? Personally I have been thinking that a root cellar should be first, not to rush building the shelter although there may be incentives for building the shelter, I forget. You could live in the root cellar at first, then transition to the wapiti once you are sure your crops will be sufficient. This way you could build more gardens, enlarge the fence area, etc. (as I was writing this I thought about planting deer resistant crops outside the fence, and only the plants that need protecting inside the fence, that would also increase your usable protected garden area, FWIW)
 
Wyatt Barnes
Posts: 312
7
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
For smaller amounts of food and liquids you could consider a zeer pot fridge, very old tech. http://practicalaction.org/zeer-pots A fellow in India also invented a small fridge made of clay that uses the same evaporative cooling technique.
 
Natalie Manor
Posts: 37
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Every day I learn something. Thank you for all the comments.
 
evan l pierce
Lab Ant
pollinator
Posts: 748
Location: ava, ant village
618
chicken duck forest garden greening the desert hugelkultur hunting solar wofati woodworking
  • Likes 2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Day 26

Another beautiful day. This little chipmunk has been quite successfully evading my attempts to photograph him, until today. He's been enjoying the food scraps from my compost.

Cut a few more logs for my wofati. I'm thinking I'll need about 96 for my walls that border on earth, (that's not counting the walls that border on air, posts, beams, roof, or the wings/retaining walls.) So far I've got 76 cut to 7' lengths, a couple dozen longer ones, and maybe eight 12+ footers that could be posts.

Also made some more progress on my garden beds. I'm maybe halfway done building the raised beds in the first quarter of the area I have fenced off. I think it's looking pretty good so far, but I'm anxious to get some seeds properly planted before the rains come. It's really dry right now, so I'm keeping the beds covered with mulch, even though I'm not done building them up yet.
20150503_072911.jpg
[Thumbnail for 20150503_072911.jpg]
compost monk
20150503_193554.jpg
[Thumbnail for 20150503_193554.jpg]
stacking em up
20150503_210126.jpg
[Thumbnail for 20150503_210126.jpg]
beds tucked in at dusk
 
Alan Loy
Posts: 66
Location: Melbourne Australia
3
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Wyatt Barnes wrote:For smaller amounts of food and liquids you could consider a zeer pot fridge, very old tech. http://practicalaction.org/zeer-pots A fellow in India also invented a small fridge made of clay that uses the same evaporative cooling technique.


An Australian solution is the Coolgardie Safe http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Coolgardie_safe. They are simple to make and you could repurpose an old cupboard or set of draws

How to make http://forest.mtu.edu/pcforestry/resources/studentprojects/BryanJames/BuildCoolgardie.htm
 
evan l pierce
Lab Ant
pollinator
Posts: 748
Location: ava, ant village
618
chicken duck forest garden greening the desert hugelkultur hunting solar wofati woodworking
  • Likes 4
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Day 27

Started eating into some of my tractor time today. I loaded up a trailer with logs in preparation for moving them to my building site. I'm not sure how much the trailer can handle, so I stopped short of loading my entire pile on. Between the trailer, the pile, and the logs that have already been moved over, I think I might almost have enough for the posts, the beams, the walls that border on earth, and maybe even a good bit of the roof.

I'm expecting some rain tomorrow, so it should be a good time to get lots of work done on my garden.
20150504_203956.jpg
[Thumbnail for 20150504_203956.jpg]
shiny tractor time
20150504_204127.jpg
[Thumbnail for 20150504_204127.jpg]
big sky
20150413_114040.jpg
[Thumbnail for 20150413_114040.jpg]
some other kind of growie
 
evan l pierce
Lab Ant
pollinator
Posts: 748
Location: ava, ant village
618
chicken duck forest garden greening the desert hugelkultur hunting solar wofati woodworking
  • Likes 8
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Day 28

No rain today after all. I think it rained for about 2 minutes last night, and that was it. But it was nice and cloudy today, and I was able to work well into the afternoon without overheating. My garden beds are coming together. I think I'll be ready to plant some seeds tomorrow morning.

I also biked down to basecamp and helped chop up tomatoes and whatnot for some Cinco De Mayo Pico De Gallo. Mmmhmm!

Jocelyn informs me that all these big gorgeous yellow flowers that are popping up all over basecamp are arrowleaf balsamroot, a native edible. Cool!
20150505_151024.jpg
[Thumbnail for 20150505_151024.jpg]
some rain would be nice
20150505_174349.jpg
[Thumbnail for 20150505_174349.jpg]
spice of the rooster?
20150423_193605.jpg
[Thumbnail for 20150423_193605.jpg]
arrowleaf balsamroot
 
Skip LaCroix
Posts: 60
Location: Reeds Spring, MO z 6-7 prev South Florida, z 10a-10b 1989-2015 prev 1981-1989 North Vermont
10
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Hey there Evan. Love all the wonderful photos and ideas being spread on this thread.

I have recently discovered a very interesting video series available on Youtube. It's a BBC documentary on a project in progress to build a 13th century castle using only 13th century techniques and materials. I thought that maybe it might contain some useful ideas and construction concepts for you and your amazing journey. It's called "Secrets of the Castle with Ruth, Peter, and Tom."

Keep up the good work and much luck to ya.

https://youtu.be/L5IMeODLND8
 
evan l pierce
Lab Ant
pollinator
Posts: 748
Location: ava, ant village
618
chicken duck forest garden greening the desert hugelkultur hunting solar wofati woodworking
  • Likes 8
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Day 29

I planted more seeds today! Marianne Cicala sent a whole bunch to the gappers a while back, and since there's currently no gappers here that want to plant them, I asked if I could take some and Marianne said yes. I planted these more carefully than that last batch I just threw out. This latest round actually got covered with dirt, imagine that. I also went around and gathered lots of dandelion seed pod heads and blew them all over my garden.

When I was digging around, I came across a fair number of juicy looking earthworms. I was quite pleased to see these little dudes hard at work enriching the soil.

The sun is setting behind the western mountains now and the sky is every shade of indigo, violet, pink, and orange as I write this.
20150506_180100.jpg
[Thumbnail for 20150506_180100.jpg]
systematic seeding
20150419_112509.jpg
[Thumbnail for 20150419_112509.jpg]
go little dude go
20150506_205016.jpg
[Thumbnail for 20150506_205016.jpg]
sunset
 
Sue Rine
pollinator
Posts: 296
Location: New Zealand
7
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Loving this thread. Go Evan!
 
Lorenzo Costa
steward
Posts: 801
Location: Italy, Siena, Gaiole in Chianti zone 9
207
books forest garden trees woodworking
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Evan the ant you are inspirational, I love your thread. keep on sharing your achievements. I would love so much to be a gapper on your place, don't worry I can't i write from Italy, but just to let you know I would if I could. can you tell us the address to send you some care packages sorry I don't remember if you already have.

 
paul wheaton
master steward
Posts: 22335
Location: missoula, montana (zone 4)
bee chicken hugelkultur trees wofati woodworking
  • Likes 3
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Lorenzo Costa wrote: can you tell us the address to send you some care packages


evan c/o paul wheaton
2120 s reserve #351
missoula, mt 59801

 
evan l pierce
Lab Ant
pollinator
Posts: 748
Location: ava, ant village
618
chicken duck forest garden greening the desert hugelkultur hunting solar wofati woodworking
  • Likes 4
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Day 30

I felt like gourds were underrepresented in my planting, so I took some of those seeds Charles sent and stuck them in towards the bottoms of my garden beds. There's a little puddle of standing water about 30 feet away from my garden spot, so I figured I'd go ahead and start using it to let my seeds know I want them to get to germinating. I cut off the top and poked some holes in a bottom corner of a gallon water jug, and along with a 5 gallon bucket, had myself a little makeshift watering can. I ended up drizzling about 25 gallons on my raised beds this morning, and then another 25 this evening. Not much, but maybe it'll wake those seeds up a bit. That puddle will be dry soon though, so hopefully it'll rain before long.

Also got the trailer unloaded and the second round of logs for my octawofati cut up and loaded onto it. Cutting through a hundred or so dry logs wasn't as bad as it sounds, but I reckon my bowsaw will need some sharpening soon.

After a hearty meal of eggs and veggies scrambled in butter, I took stock of my food supply and noted that I'm pretty much out of animal products, aside from a little bear of honey that I haven't opened yet. I thought, hey, I've got lots of rice and beans and coconut oil and avocados, I could experiment with being a vegan for thirty days and see how it makes me feel. So I guess I'm gonna try to do that and maybe after thirty days I'll experiment with paleo or raw or something and eventually maybe eating exclusively off the land.
20150507_091303.jpg
[Thumbnail for 20150507_091303.jpg]
gourds and a puddle
20150507_170757.jpg
[Thumbnail for 20150507_170757.jpg]
stacking those logs
20150504_185940.jpg
[Thumbnail for 20150504_185940.jpg]
some kind of moth
 
Burra Maluca
Mother Tree
Posts: 9922
Location: Portugal
908
bee bike books duck forest garden greening the desert solar trees wofati
  • Likes 2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
evan l pierce wrote:

After a hearty meal of eggs and veggies scrambled in butter, I took stock of my food supply and noted that I'm pretty much out of animal products, aside from a little bear of honey that I haven't opened yet. I thought, hey, I've got lots of rice and beans and coconut oil and avocados, I could experiment with being a vegan for thirty days and see how it makes me feel. So I guess I'm gonna try to do that and maybe after thirty days I'll experiment with paleo or raw or something and eventually maybe eating exclusively off the land.


Are there many wild green edibles around? I seem to be surrounded by lamb's quarters and mallow and wild mustard at the moment but my location and climate are somewhat different. Rice and beans is much better when there's a load of green stuff to throw in with it.
 
Wyatt Barnes
Posts: 312
7
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Turkey, venison? My grandfather didn't hunt, but he carried a gun when he worked the fields. I expect he thought of it as harvesting.
 
Lee Daniels
Posts: 63
Location: Eastern WA -- 5b-6a
3
  • Likes 4
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Evan will need to wait 180 days (from whenever he arrived) before he can get his MT residency.... or pay non-resident hunting license fees. 100's of dollars for license and appropriate tags.

Spring Turkey? maybe MT has a season. Spring deer? I'm highly doubtful.


Hang tight Evan, find their water sources, bedding areas, and travel routes. In October, should be close to your 180 days, after you renew your DL, you can buy resident tags and it'll be way cheaper, and legal.

Montana hunting regs
 
Richard Gorny
pollinator
Posts: 266
Location: Poland, zone 5
49
books forest garden fungi greening the desert hugelkultur urban
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I always wanted to ask - are there any fishing opportunities at wheaton labs and in its vicinity?

As to the diet change - they say a human body adjusts to a new diet in up to three weeks, so changing the diet entirely every 30 days is not gonna give trustworthy results. From my experience it is better to have a transistion period of 2-3 weeks when you change your diet gradually, then to stay on the new one for 4-6 weeks to see how it works for you. Then, if you like, enter another transition period that will lead you to another test diet. Your gut bacteria will be grateful for that
 
Wyatt Barnes
Posts: 312
7
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
If it doesn't I wouldn't drink the water. There are strategies to bait areas of a waterway to try to increase the odds of having fish present at a fishing event.
 
evan l pierce
Lab Ant
pollinator
Posts: 748
Location: ava, ant village
618
chicken duck forest garden greening the desert hugelkultur hunting solar wofati woodworking
  • Likes 8
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Sunflower Deeproot - Chapter 1

"Hey Sunny, are you excited about the dinner party at Willigood's? It's gonna be a ruckus what with that band from out west playing and all. I'm sure Daisy will be there..." Tom delivered this last line with an unsubtle wink and a nudge.

Sunny stopped pulling weeds and looked at Tom to see if he was pulling his leg. "What party? I didn't hear about any party."

"Oh? Everyone who's anyone in Eastshire is gonna be there. You didn't get an invitation?"

Sunny returned to his weeding with determination. "No... I didn't..."

"Oh. Well forget I mentioned it then."

The two continued their task in silence. Sunny's usually effective rhythm was a little off, and he kept accidentally ripping the tops off while leaving the roots in the ground. The weeds would undoubtedly regrow if Sunny didn't get the whole plant out by the root, but he just moved on to the next patch, his frustration slowly mounting.

After a few minutes, Tom broke the silence. "It's probably because you're too tall."

"What!?" Sunny was indeed of above average height compared to most Nicefolk. But it's not like he was one of the Tallfolk. He said as much. "It's not like I'm one of the Tallfolk."

"Well, you may as well be. Willigood probably doesn't want you showing up and having to duck just to get through the front door." Tom chuckled a bit to himself at the thought. "It'd be embarassing for everybody. Willigood wants a very specific sort of atmosphere there, I'm sure."

Sunny continued ineffectively weeding, refusing to dignify Tom's comments with a response.

Tom made it to the end of his row and stood up, stretching and yawning. "There's just two more rows left. Ya don't mind if I knock off early so I can take a bath before the party, do ya?"

Sunny mumbled something that sounded like "Sure."

"Thanks Sunny. I owe you one."

Tom hurried off down the path and Sunny was left alone in the garden. He finished his row and moved on to the next with a sigh. By the time he made it to the end of that row, he'd gotten back into a good rhythm and the weeds in the last row were coming out with ease. When he finally finished, the sun was setting and the sound of a band starting to play could be heard in the distance. What he could hear of the music sounded hip and pretty danceable, and he briefly considered the idea of sneaking into the party anyway, but Tom was right, he would stick out like a sore thumb.

As he was heading home, he decided to take a detour through the woods, partly in an attempt to muffle the sounds of laughter and applause. It wasn't the first time Sunny had walked through this part of the forest at night, but by the time he was far enough away from town that he could no longer hear the unwelcome revelry, he found himself in less well known surroundings. The high oak and hemlock canopy blocked out most of the starlight, and the waxing crescent of a moon did little to illuminate his path. Sunny decided to stop distractedly wandering before he got himself lost, and so he sat down cross-legged on a stump.

Sunny focused on his breath. Perhaps meditation would help clear his mind of this all too familiar feeling of being snubbed.

~~~~~~~~


Day 31

Obviously my life is not experimental enough. So in addition to this temporary vegan diet experiment, (which after considering Richard's comments and doing a little research, I now think 60 days will be a better test,) I'm also going to use this thread to document some of the other, even weirder, craziness that's floating around in my head. I figure now that you, my lovely audience, are hanging on my every post, I'll subject you to rough drafts of my hobbity literature, in serial form. Mwuahahaha! If this isn't your cup of tea, feel free to skip over the tiny green text that will occasionally appear at the tops of my posts, and continue enjoying the nitty gritty details of my normal boring life carving out a permaculture homestead in ant village.

Besides doing a bit of writing, cutting and limbing some fence materials, and watering my garden, I also worked on a sketchup design of the octagonalish shelter I'm planning to build. It's pretty funky.
20150508_202802(0).jpg
[Thumbnail for 20150508_202802(0).jpg]
diy watering can in action
octagonalish-post-and-beam.png
[Thumbnail for octagonalish-post-and-beam.png]
octagonalish post and beam
20150508_144441.jpg
[Thumbnail for 20150508_144441.jpg]
lamb's quarters
 
Michael Cox
Posts: 1667
Location: Kent, UK - Zone 8
54
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Re the wofati-esque plans... looks like by adding the side wings you are adding considerable wall and roof but minimal floor area. What about two octagons side to side, giving you twice the floor area but sticking to one building/design approach? You get to stick with your shorter log length too.
 
Dave Smythe
Posts: 12
3
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Have you considered a hexayurt structure? Triangles are better structurally than squares. Or do you need the extra porches on the octagon?

http://www.appropedia.org/Hexayurt_frame

Love this thread by the way
 
Judith Browning
Posts: 5906
Location: Arkansas Ozarks zone 7 alluvial,black,deep loam/clay with few rocks, wonderful creek bottom!
365
bike chicken fungi trees urban woodworking
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
rough drafts of my hobbity literature, in serial form.


Oh, boy....Just like the Whole Earth Catalog I always loved following the story in the early catalogs (do they still do that?) along the edges of the pages. We will be patiently waiting for the next installment. .....and the daily pictures are wonderful also!
 
evan l pierce
Lab Ant
pollinator
Posts: 748
Location: ava, ant village
618
chicken duck forest garden greening the desert hugelkultur hunting solar wofati woodworking
  • Likes 6
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Day 32

Hauled and staged tons of logs for my wofati today. I also scoped out a couple big trees on my plot that I'm thinking I'll take down and mill into lumber. I'll be using milled lumber for the wing retaining walls, and logs for pretty much everything else.

The idea with the wings is to have light, air, and views from all four cardinal directions while still keeping lots of dry earth close to the living space. The wings will also provide storage spaces for things like storing firewood and tools, a compost toilet area, and maybe a sort of mini-kitchen area. They'll also make it relatively easy to expand in the future, whether with attached greenhouses or more living space. They do add some complexity, however, and I definitely won't be able to singlehandedly place the super long beams that top the gables and span the length and width of the structure, but there'll only be a couple of them.
octagonalish-shoring.png
[Thumbnail for octagonalish-shoring.png]
octagonalish shoring
octagonalish-earth-berm.png
[Thumbnail for octagonalish-earth-berm.png]
octagonalish earth berm
20150508_144630.jpg
[Thumbnail for 20150508_144630.jpg]
dandelion
 
Whatever. Here's a tiny ad:
2017 Rocket Mass Heater Workshop Jamboree - 15 workshops in one event
https://permies.com/wiki/63312/permaculture-projects/Rocket-Mass-Heater-Workshop-Jamboree
  • Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
Boost this thread!