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Movie: Food Beware: The French Organic Revolution

 
                        
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I just finished watching, "Food Beware: The French Organic Revolution" or "Nos Enfant Nous Accuseront" (my translation: Our children will accuse us).  This documentary shows a small village in southern France whose town council decided their public schools needed organic produce at school.  I couldn't get the entire sense from the film- perhaps the children paid for each meal?  I did appreciate the stories of individual farmers whose families suffered from pesticide use, the families, children and teachers who learned and grew more familiar with organic  (they even learned less is more), and the beautiful scenery (and opportunity to hear some French! )  The movie is subtitled in English.  I watched it on Netflix streaming.

What do you think about this?  I think it is a wonderful idea to try to get public schools to incorporate organic fare into school lunches!

http://www.rottentomatoes.com/m/food_beware/
 
steward
Posts: 2482
Location: FL
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The idea is sound-healthy, nutritious, chemical free foods for growing children.  If there is a finer ideal I do not know of it. 

Unfortunately, the reality of the situation has everything to do with economics and ignorance and next to nothing to do with the food.  Budgets are being slashed in school departments, and food programs often are the first targets.  Years ago there was much hooplah about ketchup being listed as a vegetable.  Politics and school lunch programs just don't blend in a manner conducive to the health needs of the students. 

I ran across an article recently...

Under the 2008 farm bill, the District received $1.2 million this school year to serve students a vegetable or piece of fruit outside of breakfast and lunch hours. The program is likely to expand to more schools next year as funding increases to $1.7 million.



To see what the beancounters and bureaucrats came up with as a fresh snack, you gotta read the article.
 
steward
Posts: 7926
Location: Currently in Lake Stevens, WA. Home in Spokane
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It sounds like whoever had the iron-clad contract to supply food to the school was just sending them whatever he had a surplus of.

I read an article a couple years ago about a grower who was concerned when the school's budget had been severely cut.  He took in boxes of apples from his orchard.  Enough to supply each student and staff.  The school refused to accept it because their contract with the supplier did not allow food from any other source.
 
                        
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Well, onions are healthy.  I wonder if these fresh fruits and veggies are washed prior to being served.  A healthy snack is all well and good, but if it's coated with poison...
 
Everyone is a villain in someone else's story. Especially this devious tiny ad:
Devious Experiments for a Truly Passive Greenhouse!
https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/paulwheaton/greenhouse-1
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