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Question on nesting

 
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I have a chicken that laid 7 eggs and has not laid any more.  I have another that is starting to lay eggs, can I move the 7 eggs to the other chickens nest?
 
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hugelkultur forest garden books urban chicken food preservation
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Fertile eggs?  Do you have a rooster that is active with the ladies?  I'm assuming that its your goal to have the girls hatch the eggs?

A bird has to be broody in order to want to sit on the eggs.  Is she acting differently -- only leaving the nesting box once or twice a day to get a drink, eat a quick snack or take a quick dust bath?  Does she fluff up her feathers when you attempt to take her eggs out of the nesting box?  Is she more aggressive than normal?  If you're not noticing any of these signs, your girl probably isn't broody.  You're better off using those eggs for an omelet.  

Most hens go broody at least once a year, and often multiple times.  She'll let you know if she wants to sit on the eggs.  But just moving eggs from one nesting box away from a non-broody hen to another nesting box with another non-broody hen really won't do you much good.





Mmmmmm . . . an omelet.
 
Idania Amor
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Yes I do have a rooster.  The eggs have been there for over a week
Are they good to eat.
 
Idania Amor
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Thank you
 
Marco Banks
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Yes, they should still be perfectly fine to eat.  To check them, fill a bowl full of cold water.  Put the eggs in the water one at a time and see if they sink to the bottom.  

If they lay flat on the bottom of the bowl under water, they are good to use.  

If one end of the egg starts to raise up and they "stand up" under water, they are still good but you should cook them well --- a hard boiled egg would be a good way to use that egg.  

If they float or are just about ready to float off the bottom, discard those eggs.  You can always cook them and feed them right back to your chickens.  Never feed them raw eggs (because they'll get the taste for raw eggs and then will go around pecking eggs and eating them).  I'll occasionally find a rouge egg that one of the girls laid out under a bush somewhere.  I'll cook it up (usually boil it) and then crumble it into their feed, shell and all.

As long as the eggs haven't been washed, they have a protective coating on them that keeps bacteria out.  In most parts of the world, people do not wash their eggs so they don't need to be refrigerated.  But once you wash them, you'll need to put them in the fridge.  They'll last up to 50 days when they are refrigerated, but they don't taste fresh the way an unwashed, unrefrigerated egg does.  

The reason why they don't spoil when left out unrefrigerated is because when a hen is building a big clutch of eggs, she isn't going to sit on them until she feels she's got enough for a big brood.  She may lay as many as 15 eggs.  12 is normal, which is why eggs have traditionally been sold by the dozen.  Once she's laid her clutch of eggs, she'll begin to sit on them, and they will all incubate at the same time.  That way they all hatch at the same time.  They'll all hatch within a day or so, and away they'll go as a new family.

Enjoy those eggs.  Once your girls go broody, you'll see a clear difference in their behavior.  They'll be telling you, "I want to sit on these eggs."


 
today's feeble attempt to support the empire
dry stack retaining wall
https://permies.com/t/85178/dry-stack-retaining-wall
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