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Codling Moth

 
Posts: 715
Location: PA-Zone 6
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This was my first year getting nectarine and peaches from my trees. I noticed that I have codling moth activity on all my fruit. Ive read that planting allium and lavender will help deter them, but are there any other methods used to control them besides spraying? My thinking was that I should pick all of these fruit off now so it will not allow this generation to multiple. Will that help or am I just wasting my time? Any help would be appreciated.
 
Posts: 143
Location: Zone 5 Brimfield, MA
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Bat houses, pheromone traps
 
steward
Posts: 3999
Location: Wellington, New Zealand. Temperate, coastal, sandy, windy,
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Coddlin moths (well, caterpillars), are a total sod. Bt's no good since they're generally hanging out inside your fruit...
I'd definitely get rid of the fruit. I've been told the worms can surviveĀ  pretty adverse conditions, so I'd chuck the fruit in a barrel of water and let it ferment before composting.
People use tanglefoot-type things to get the ones heading to ground-level.
Pheromone traps.
Clean off any old, loose bark where they can pupate.
Chooks areĀ  the best of all: the second generation of worms here (hopefully your climate doesn't allow two...) overwinter in the soil under the tree.
At the end of the season let the chooks into the orchard to scratch up the mulch, eat the pupae, and poo round about. They also eat any infected apples on the ground.
They'll also help with black spot.
 
Rob Sigg
Posts: 715
Location: PA-Zone 6
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Good stuff, Im getting chickens in 3 weeks and that is my plan
 
Posts: 520
Location: Eastern Kansas
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I have heard, but not tried, that spraying the fruit a few times with a fine clay mix is good. It covers the fruit and prevents the attention of the female fly.

Again, I have not tried this.
 
Rob Sigg
Posts: 715
Location: PA-Zone 6
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Might be DE?
 
Leila Rich
steward
Posts: 3999
Location: Wellington, New Zealand. Temperate, coastal, sandy, windy,
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Think it's kaolin-based. I just can't imagine how I could ever thoroughly spray large trees.
 
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