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Bolivia is making a law that will give rights to Mother Earth.

 
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Just in case you missed this, Bolivia is creating a law that will give rights to Mother Earth, it is best described as this:

“Mother Earth is a living dynamic system made up of the undivided community of all living beings, who are all interconnected, interdependent and complementary, sharing a common destiny.”
The law would give nature legal rights, specifically the rights to life and regeneration, biodiversity, water, clean air, balance, and restoration.


Read the full article here:
http://www.yesmagazine.org/planet/the-law-of-mother-earth-behind-bolivias-historic-bill

What are your thoughts? I am personally very, very impressed with this level of thinking on a governmental level!

With love for the Earth,
Berry
 
pollinator
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I will be impressed if it leads to behavioral changes that reflect the thinking.
 
steward
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I wonder who will defend her rights in any legal battle.
Hopefully, NOT the same politicians who have strived for the last half century to strip those rights away from "her".
 
Bram van Overbeeke
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It was written by the indeginous population of Bolivia, following their own view of the earth. Bolivia still has 64% or so indigenous population and for the first time since european takeover there is an indigenous president, these people have previously stopped a water privatisation by the 'western apointed' false president and subsequently booted him out. They have strong 'farmer to farmer' movement, that is spreading knowledge and struggle from village to village using skillsharing.
Who will end up defending her rights I do not know, but I assume it will be people that feel connected or share that nature with her. There's many indigenous living in close connection with the earth still, living and farming in harmony and sometimes people want to move into those territories and get the oil or whatever. I take it that this will allow people to sue in name of nature and its balance, then I further assume that this will eventually call for a 'sub-branch' of environmental lawyer.

The most hopeful thing is in my opinion that this kindof thinking has now entered the political arena.
 
John Polk
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Hopefully, giving "her" a name, and granting her citizenship, with equal rights, will send a message to the government that it is no longer "Business-as-usual".  Perhaps, some other forward thinking governments will follow suit.  Until we all understand that "she" is suffering at our hands, she will not be able to heal herself.

There are a lot of very poor people in Bolivia, and believe me, it is not easy to farm (without machinery) at 13,000 feet (over 4,000metres) elevation.
 
Bram van Overbeeke
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John Polk wrote:
There are a lot of very poor people in Bolivia, and believe me, it is not easy to farm (without machinery) at 13,000 feet (over 4,000metres) elevation.


Which is why I think they would be protected under this new law as well, because big development would threaten the balance of their ecosystem.
 
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i've been living in bolivia since may, getting by to NY in august. 
i hadnt heard about htis law but that is awesome..
, is it really being made a law or is this only a proposal ?
how many amazing sounding proposals get made each year,and fail?

i'll reserve my enthusiasm for its passage and funding/enforcement.
the president here tried now (the narco coca farmer many here call him)
tried to pass a law to require old vehicles be registered and i think maybe some emissions control...the commercial drivewrs protested by blockading all teh roads and bringing the city to its knees basically... its pretty common here.. anytime anyone protesting anything,bçfor better or worse,wants attention they simply block up the main roads in and out of cities...same just happened for a water strike in el alto La Paz. and also in Peru with the canadian mining comppany wanting to mine near Titicaca (that one got real nasty, the people started attacking all travelrs and setting fire to border checkpoints, u couldnt get in or out of peru by land for weeks.
thankfully its open again, im heading to cusco soon for Pachamama Hatun Festival...cant wait!!
 
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