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Pecan varieties for Western Missouri  RSS feed

 
pollinator
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Location: Nevada, Mo 64772
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Our local Walmart has some really nice potted pecan trees.  They are Zinner and Huffman.  Another store has Stuart.  I’m pretty sure I’m too far north for Stuart. I wasn’t able to find much out about Zinner and Huffman. Does anyone know if these will survive and ripen before frost here? I’m 90 miles south of KC, MO.

This is area is a big producer of native pecans. I don’t know if Southern or paper shell pecans grow here. The flavor of the natives is better with a much higher oil content. They are small and hard to crack though. I have a lot of native seedlings planted. I’m looking for a few good, grafted varieties. I ordered a Peruque and a Colby from Starks. I’d like to find a couple more varieties.

 
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Just wanted to chime in about the native varieties. I am in south central Mo and have 24-30" abh  pecan trees all around my house. They are really good and dont seem to be too hard to crack. Seedlings everywhere, and they grow fast. The neatest thing I have discovered about them is that they not only deliver a payload at harvest time, but also hold fruit nearly all winter, dropping it a little at a time. I did not realize this until a few years back when we had a big snow and then that got covered with a layer of ice. Every day there were new pecans on top of the ice and the wildlife was happy for it.
 
Ken W Wilson
pollinator
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Location: Nevada, Mo 64772
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I like the natives. My main reason to buy a few grafted trees too is that grafted trees usually produce years sooner. Also for variety.
 
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