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Berry woes in central Alberta  RSS feed

 
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Hi there. Aspiring permie here. Recently acquired a home and was thrilled to get my garden on but I may have overshot. I'm open to any advice at all, suggestions on placement, but mostly want to treat what is affecting these plants based on what their leaves are doing as that's what's worrying me most. My planting method was typically the same for each plant. Dig out a reasonably sized hole into the grass, pour in compost, scrape the sides of the hole and mix with compost, then plant and fill in with top soil/compost/preexisting soil, then a layer of mulch using in a ring around the edge of the grass. I'm of the opinion most of these are suffering from over-watering and I'm tempted to transplant and raise these plants a bit by putting mulch underneath so they can breathe, but I just don't know! any insight would be super appreciated.
(White splotches on leaves are from diatomaceous earth solution)

First off, here is my layout.

Black squares are the house and garage, grey is concrete. Brown full rectangles are garden beds, hollow are fence.  Big light purple X's are lilac bushes. Stars are bushes and circles are trees. Coloured rectangles are plant beds. (blue/blueberry, pink/raspberry, red/strawberry, brown/various).

Here's the front  and here before I added a few more things.

On the south side of the front, the blue stars are haskaps. 1=blue moon, 2=blue belle, 3=(cant remember which honeyberry)
red are cherry; 1=juliet, 2-crimson passion - starting to show yellow leaves, red spots. Also who are these guys?

(tree is evans)
(I cant remember which picture is the tundra and which is the boreal.
north side; 1=boreal blizzard, 2=tundra, 3=borealis

The borealis was in rough shape when transplanted, and has just.not.improved. I pruned it pretty hard last night.

the two orange stars on either side of the stoop are seaberries. russian orange is looking rough and i cant remember the other one.
the two stars in the bed attached to the front of the house are goji. they look ok, not sure on their placement.

the box to the north has black berries. I reused the pre-existing box, which was for compost, by putting some cardboard over the stuff on the bottom, then mulch/compost, then lots of leaves, then dug out a hole, put soil, planted it, more leaves (so the soil wouldn't leak out).

Its leaves were getting almost black-ish... I pruned a lot of them but here are other symptoms.

This apple tree is also breaking my heart. It has several breeds grafted. All look rough.

Out back, my strawberries have some strange things. And more.

The Blueberries are worrying too. These two are from last year and there are trace signs of life but I just don't know..
These guys are starting to get red spots.
This one is showing way different signs on two different branches.
[url=http://i100.photobucket.com/albums/m10/rpenguin/20180531_121322.jpg]More spots.
And redness.

Blueberries are (dead ones) pink lemonade + northcountry, northsky, endless summer original, and two more that I cannot remember.

Finally, one other question. I have a Goldspur Cherry tree in the back. As far as I know it's ornamental, but I'm inclined to graft other cherries/hazlenuts/peaches to it. Is that crazy? Are there any suggestions or advice?
 
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Location: Vilonia, Arkansas - Zone 7B/8A stoney, sandy loam soil pH 6.5
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How much water are you putting on them and how often? 
What did the previous owner use on the "lawn" poison wise and fertilizer wise?
Where did the compost you used come from, how was it made?
Usually yellowing leaves are caused by lack of mineral balance, magnesium and manganese along with iron defect are some of the usual reasons for yellowing leaves.

Blue berries like acidic soil, if they aren't doing well, pH would be the first thing to check and adjust if needed.


 
jason minatel
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Bryant RedHawk wrote:How much water are you putting on them and how often? 
What did the previous owner use on the "lawn" poison wise and fertilizer wise?
Where did the compost you used come from, how was it made?
Usually yellowing leaves are caused by lack of mineral balance, magnesium and manganese along with iron defect are some of the usual reasons for yellowing leaves.

Blue berries like acidic soil, if they aren't doing well, pH would be the first thing to check and adjust if needed.




1. So after planting I soaked them rather heavily, foliage and all (woops!) Recognizing that almost immediately I have backed off substantially. We've had about two rainfalls in the last two weeks, since planting, that I've relied on. In the case of the Borealis and Blackberries, and strawberries (not the ones pictured) and some of the blue berries, I've poked the soil and determined they were a bit dry, so they may have gotten water maybe twice a week. The strawberries aren't planted very deep so maybe even 3 or 4 times for them.
The Borealis in particular was ridiculously dry despite what seemed like mildew.

2. I can't answer that, but I did acquire the house last summer (August) and have left things generally untouched. Would poisons survive through fall/winter/spring?
3. The compost, along with top soil, and mulch, were all purchased from the store.
The apple tree was actually planted in rather acidic soil (triple mix w/peat moss+compost) I've added some compost to the top, so it hopefully leaches into the soil...
It also underwent a pretty traumatic replanting, since the first hole I dug was rather pitiful. I dug an adjacent one and during the migration the rootstock, in terms of being like, a mass of soil, was practically destroyed. So when I replanted it, it looked like this. Does it still have a chance?

I got a whole bunch of peat moss that I've used like mulch on the blueberries and strawberries. I've added a bit to the Borealis just because it's looked so darn rough, I thought maybe the compost/soil mixture had made it too basic.
 
Bryant RedHawk
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Location: Vilonia, Arkansas - Zone 7B/8A stoney, sandy loam soil pH 6.5
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1), sounds like you  probably are over watering if they are planted in the ground, if they are in containers, you want to make sure you have a straw pushed in to the bottom of the container and use a "dip stick" to check moisture, not your finger, it can't reach down deep enough for a good reading.

2) poisons can last over 10 years in the soil. fungi are your best friend to remediate suspect soil (if there is grass, the soil is suspect).

3) store bought compost has become notorious for being contaminated (if the bag doesn't say "Organic" don't bother buying it), it didn't use to be that way but now it is.

Apple trees do not like acidic soil, some where between 6.5 and 7.2 can be considered perfect for apples, peaches, plums, pears, figs, cherries and most other fruit trees.
Blue berries want pH to be close to 5.5
Best amendment for blue berries is sulfur, peat works fair if it is worked into the soil prior to planting.

Basic is anything higher than 7.2  acidic is anything lower than 7.0 (neutral)

hope that helps you out.

Redhawk
 
jason minatel
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Bryant RedHawk wrote:1), sounds like you  probably are over watering if they are planted in the ground, if they are in containers, you want to make sure you have a straw pushed in to the bottom of the container and use a "dip stick" to check moisture, not your finger, it can't reach down deep enough for a good reading.

2) poisons can last over 10 years in the soil. fungi are your best friend to remediate suspect soil (if there is grass, the soil is suspect).

3) store bought compost has become notorious for being contaminated (if the bag doesn't say "Organic" don't bother buying it), it didn't use to be that way but now it is.

Apple trees do not like acidic soil, some where between 6.5 and 7.2 can be considered perfect for apples, peaches, plums, pears, figs, cherries and most other fruit trees.
Blue berries want pH to be close to 5.5
Best amendment for blue berries is sulfur, peat works fair if it is worked into the soil prior to planting.

Basic is anything higher than 7.2  acidic is anything lower than 7.0 (neutral)

hope that helps you out.

Redhawk



Very informative, thank you very much. I acquired some probes to get a better sense of moisture and check pH. Since it was overcast and rain was due, I decided to dig out and replant all the blueberries, black berries, and strawberries and amend the soil  heavily with peat moss, raise them up, and use mulch to provide a bit of a basin.
Blackberries are currently in containers and I'm debating where to put them. (Maybe at the NE corner by the raspberries)
I think my main problem, and I've encountered this before, is that my plants seem root bound by the stock mass it was purchased with. I generally try to massage the mass and roots as indicated but feel I get too aggressive before anything significant seems to happen. Guess I'll see if the soil amendment helps!
 
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