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Endangered plants project  RSS feed

 
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Hi Everyone,


I am came across a plant that I found very interesting to me. It is an endangered plant that used to be all along the shores in Bay Area. I decided to try and grow the scrub (which I am doing), and will plant out some of the plants. The plant is California Sea Blite.

I looked around, and there is not much work being done to help endangered plants. In all honesty it is pretty much non-existent. If any of your are interested, I would love your help. I know there is concern of the government approaching on your land, especially if they here that you have endangered plants on your property. I found this article that I thought might be useful.  Endangered plants We could grown the plants in pots then plant them in locations in where they are known to grow, and not on our property.

I setup up a website to mark the locations of plants being grown. If you look at California you can see the plant I am growing. e plant collective I would love to hear everyones thoughts, and would love your help to get this project going.

What I am asking you to do.

1. Find a list of plants near you.
2. Located and identify the plant you are going to collect from and try and protect/save.
3. Collect seeds or cuttings from the plant.(Only what you need to get started)
4. Contact me with the plants name and location of the plant. (This can be where you plant to plant it out)
5. Care for and plant out the plants when they are ready.

I would love to see this project get going, and would greatly appreciate your help.

Thanks,

Josh


  
 
pollinator
Posts: 266
Location: Montana
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In California there are quite a few rare and even endangered plants grandfathered into the horticultural trade. A few years ago I was in Santa Barbara and was growing all the Berberis nevinii I could purchase and had plans to propagate more. It can be bought completely legally.

Some other species are quite protected when rare. I would recommend joining forces and volunteering with an organization doing rare plant increase legally. The institute for applied ecology is one such. They have done significant increase of a rare paintbrush in Oregon.

Here the Montana native plant society has done some work with Spalding's Catchfly.
 
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Location: South of the the headwaters to the tributary at the final bend of the Monongahela River
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On the other side of the continent, American Chestnut has mostly been extirpated due to the chestnut blight, however a few blight resistant trees and stands still exists throughout their original range.
Hazelnut and Paw-Paw are very difficult to find here as well...
 
J Argyle
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In California there are quite a few rare and even endangered plants grandfathered into the horticultural trade. A few years ago I was in Santa Barbara and was growing all the Berberis nevinii I could purchase and had plans to propagate more. It can be bought completely legally.

Some other species are quite protected when rare. I would recommend joining forces and volunteering with an organization doing rare plant increase legally. The institute for applied ecology is one such. They have done significant increase of a rare paintbrush in Oregon.

Here the Montana native plant society has done some work with Spalding's Catchfly.



Hi William,

Thanks for your reply. I am familiar with some of the organizations you suggested. I like what they are doing, but lot of them are trying to do to much. At least in this area a lot of their main focus on removing the non-native species. There also seems to be a lot of red tape, and the events they have are fun, but you don't really feel like you changed much. I want something for someone like myself who does not have a lot of time, but wants to help. I though it if one person focused on one plant it, and would be a way for someone to give back to the area.
 
J Argyle
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On the other side of the continent, American Chestnut has mostly been extirpated due to the chestnut blight, however a few blight resistant trees and stands still exists throughout their original range.
Hazelnut and Paw-Paw are very difficult to find here as well...



Hi Donald,

I have heard a little bit about the chestnut issue. I would love to read more about the resistant trees stands. Do you have any links for this?

Thanks,

Josh
 
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