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Is this great burdock? nope, it's cocklebur!

 
Posts: 7645
Location: Ozarks zone 7 alluvial,black,deep clay/loam with few rocks, wonderful creek bottom!
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Great burdock, arctium lappa L. ?

I think it is and will be sure when it flowers and sets seed but at the moment am uncertain.

The leaves of this one seem broader than the ones in my books and the pics on line but otherwise look very similar including green upside and whitish underneath the leaf....large rhubarb like leaves, solid, celery like stalk.

I have common burdock (arctium minus) that I am growing from seed and know that it is not that.
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pollinator
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Location: Central Texas USA Latitude 30 Zone 8
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Sure looks like it to me!
 
Judith Browning
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Location: Ozarks zone 7 alluvial,black,deep clay/loam with few rocks, wonderful creek bottom!
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Tyler Ludens wrote:Sure looks like it to me!



Thank you Tyler...it is growing  along a ditch on a country road where we walk frequently so I want to try to catch it when the seed is mature and before the farmer sprays his ditches
 
pollinator
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Location: Officially Zone 7b, according to personal obsevations I live in 7a, SW Tennessee
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I grow Great Burdock, and this does not look like my plants. However, it does look a lot like Cocklebur.

https://oak.ppws.vt.edu/~flessner/weedguide/xanst.htm
 
Tyler Ludens
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Guess you'll have to wait for it to bloom to know for sure!

 
Judith Browning
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thank you Joylynn.......It does look similar to cocklebur except for the description of the stem and the dark and light sides of the leaves that this has and is a distinguishing feature of great burdock....now I can't wait for it to flower! Apparently cocklebur Xanthium strumarium, has some medicinal qualities also and possibilities as a natural dye plant (yellow from the leaves and blue! from the seeds).

Time will tell
 
Judith Browning
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Location: Ozarks zone 7 alluvial,black,deep clay/loam with few rocks, wonderful creek bottom!
1471
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Got a better look and picture of my hoped for burdock.  Judging from the stem, green with red blotches it's most definitely cocklebur...leaves, shape of the plant look like it also.

I'll still try to catch it flowering and maybe try to get some yellow dye from the leaves IF the farmer back there doesn't spray it...I have a feeling it won't make it until seed.

Thanks for the link Joylynn!
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green stem with red blotches on left...and leaf.
 
Tyler Ludens
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Good job!

 
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Location: Denver CO
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I have a patch that comes back every year, it's next to the uphill neighbors horses, so the area gets 'runoff'.  I let it grow tall this year to create shade for the chickens but let it bloom longer than I planned for the bees.  They liked it almost as well as Russian sage.  I had to zoom in to find these two, my camera missed hundreds in the full size photo.  I suspect it would beat diakon for breaking hardpan soil if one was brave enough to plant acres of it!
bees_inburr.jpg
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