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Insight on wetlands/loam 4 acre plot  RSS feed

 
Posts: 2
Location: Atlanta Georgia
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Hello all! New here from Atlanta GA. We just bought a house on a lovely wooded lot with some existing wetlands and creek. Over the top excited to work with this land but a little overwhelmed. Long story short... OLD septic was functioning but drain field was saturated from high water table and county approved plans for a new one to be installed. NEW tank is in front yard now with pump system. My questions

1. How can I help my high water table OLD drain field cure itself (hopefully)?

2. Can I help the creek out with building up banks and such for flooding possibilities? It's in the far back yard

3. Can you build a hugel on top of marshy area if gravel was placed around beds and beds were taller?

Most of the plot is loam soil any advice accepted.

Also our front is all plowed now from install of new tank so suggestions maybe on ground cover for the winter? Ideas for permascape over a new drain field?

Thank you everyone! I look forward to this website as a resource

 
pollinator
Posts: 1595
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Ive been seeding a winter cover crop the last couple weeks. Ive settled into using deer foodplot mixes. I look at the white tag that has the seed percentages to determine what i want to use.

It seems that the bulk seed is either ryegrass or oats. Then there is clover, brassica,  radishes, peas based on which bag you buy.

I broadcast the seeds and it does well if timed right. I do it when the ground is wet. Peas are probably a waste since its broadcast and not buried, but in my selection the only ones that had clover also had peas. If it was bare dirt, sometimes i walked the area to push the peas into the ground.

One other option that is really really good is hay (maybe its straw). Wheat hay or oat hay that still has the seeds in it. Square bales of this spread over the ground does very good. The $ value of the seed in the bale seems to exceed the cost of the hay. Germination is excellent since the hay holds moisture and makes it harder for birds to get to it.
 
gardener
Posts: 4863
Location: Vilonia, Arkansas - Zone 7B/8A stoney, sandy loam soil pH 6.5
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Are you in a housing development and if so what are the requirements/ conditions of the Development/home owners association (if there is one). That will be your "limiting factor" for what you do with your property.
If you are rural, then most likely anything goes and that is a great thing.

Septic dispersal fields are best helped to recover by additions of fungi, particularly oyster mushroom spawn, this fungi does a lot of great remediation functions for contaminated soils.

Building Levees on a creek only works if you can levee the entire distance the creek flows, otherwise it will just flow around and erode the work you did to shore it up.
If you do decide to go this route anyway, be sure the levee is wider than the creek at the base so there will be enough "dam" to survive a flooding event, and you will want grasses growing all over this levee as quickly as possible.
Once the levee is stabilized with grass roots, you can add other plants and as they shade out the grass, the root mass will knit even better, providing solid stabilization of the levee soil.

Hugel beds will work in marshy areas but you don't dig down, you lay the logs on the surface and then cover them as usual.
Gravel is not a great idea for hugels but if you want to use it you would dig out the soil and lay the gravel in the resulting pit as a base layer.

Bermuda grass is the normal, long lasting, heat tolerant grass in the south.
I use annual rye mixed with Bermuda for the base planting then the over seeding contains more Bermuda along with other, area native grasses and other plants.
As was mentioned, deer feed plot mix works well, but if you don't want to encourage deer visiting your land and thus gardens, it might not be your best choice.

Redhawk
 
Rachel Sebourne
Posts: 2
Location: Atlanta Georgia
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We luckily have no HOA! Wonderful advice, seems that all things I want to achieve are possible with some hard work. Also I can make a fake rock cover for the septic tank lids :) thank you!!!
 
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