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Another Plant ID...  RSS feed

 
                    
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See this growing in dense groups under shaded areas with good soil. It has thin 1cm long hairs growing on its round stem.



 
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Posts: 357
Location: Beaver County, Pennsylvania (~ zone 6)
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Well, it's obv something in the daisy family(Asteraceae), maybe the sunflower genus (Helianthus) -- how tall is it? What do it's roots look like?
 
Posts: 204
Location: Germany, 7b-ish
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Salamander wrote:
Well, it's obv something in the daisy family(Asteraceae), maybe the sunflower genus (Helianthus) -- how tall is it? What do it's roots look like?



Edit: I stand corrected: Should be a Jerusalem artichoke.
 
Posts: 170
Location: western Washington, Snohomish county--zone 8b
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I have never seen a gerbera with leaves on it stem....the ones in this part of the world are not native though...they grow from a cluter of leaves and have a clean straight stem with no leaves......Is this plant a jerusalem artichoke? is is really tall and have multiple blooms on a stem?
 
Isaac Hill
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Yeah I was thinking Jerusalem Artichoke too lol
 
Isaac Hill
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You know, it could be an Arnica...
 
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Location: NW MO
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Looks a lot like Calendula: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Calendula_January_2008-1_filtered.jpg
 
                    
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Thanks guys for the help, I've figured it out. Its an invasive species called Creeping Oxeye from South America. Its in the sunflower family.
 
Thelma McGowan
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Location: western Washington, Snohomish county--zone 8b
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is it edible??
 
Michael Radelut
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auntythelma wrote:
is it edible??



It seems to have medicinal uses.
 
ronie dee
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txpc wrote:
Thanks guys for the help, I've figured it out. Its an invasive species called Creeping Oxeye from South America. Its in the sunflower family.



Can you link to the source where you found this Oxeye? I have found that exact plant that you picture growing somewhere near me. I looked around wiki and this is the closest i found and doesn't seem an exact match:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Wedelia.jpg

What kind of medicinal use do you notice that it has?
 
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It's a Rudbeckia laciniata, which I think has a common name like a green coneflower. I've got many of them. They grow into fairly deep shade, self seed moderately, are a long lived perennial, transplant easily and are quite pretty, IMHO.
 
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Kota McCoy wrote:It's a Rudbeckia laciniata, which I think has a common name like a green coneflower. I've got many of them. They grow into fairly deep shade, self seed moderately, are a long lived perennial, transplant easily and are quite pretty, IMHO.



Rudebeckia's are close relatives of echinacea. Some, I'm not sure if this one, were used by Michael Moore as a feebler echinacea type medicine. Considering it's much more common than echinacea, it would seem to bear more study.
 
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