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Adding hydro to a 24 v solar system

 
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So I have a 4 battery, 4 panel 1800w 24 volt solar system currently. Works great in the summer, really sucks in the winter.
I have a creek, good head and flow.
Is there a simple way to connect a cheap turbine like this:

https://www.ebay.com/itm/Motenergy-ME1511-Micro-Hydro-Generator-Turgo-Wheel-12-24-Volt-600-Watts-50-Amp-/201850992159?_trksid=p2385738.m4383.l4275.c10

Directly into my current system? I know I need a dump load, can that just be a fan or heater constantly running in my shop?

Looking for the simplest solution possible. Want to take advantage of the micro hydro power i have without setting up a separate or complicated system if possible.
 
Posts: 358
Location: Abkhazia · temperate subtropical climate
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Electrically, the simplest solution would be diodes from bridge rectifies. you will need voltage at full battery / (2 * forward voltage), as each bridge rectifier contains two diodes in series (and then in parallel). Mounted to a big heat sink that gives you a dump load that only turns on when the battery is full.
 
pollinator
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Location: northeastern New Mexico
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Sounds like an awesome project. Energy from moving water is an incredible asset to have nearby. Permanent magnets are the way to go for efficiency. So that power head looks good.
I bought our dump load controller as a kit from a guy on the Other Power Forums.  I found large wire wound resistors to use ans a the heat sinks. Soldering a kit like the one shown requires good soldering skills. I ordered two kits which I'm glad I did because one of the components got fried in the process and I had the second kit for extra parts.
My DLC is on an axial flux wind turbine which can generate 800 watts if the wind is right. when the wind is above 8mph it sure brings the batteries up in charge quickly.
Brian
dump-load-controller-diagram.jpg
[Thumbnail for dump-load-controller-diagram.jpg]
 
William West
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So essentially I can hook it up to my current charge controller? I just need to make sure battery doesn't overcharge...which I haven't gotten close to even in mid summer. I don't think hydro will add much power, but I would like to start experimenting.
Does anyone have a rectifier they reccomend? Where do I add it in the system? Before inverter? I have 2 bus bars for the pos/neg with plenty of space. Is that the spot?

 
Sebastian Köln
Posts: 358
Location: Abkhazia · temperate subtropical climate
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If you overcharging is definitely not a problem, then you can hook it up to the battery. Otherwise the bus bar should be the right place? (I can't give a definite answer without schematics.)

As far as the rectifier is concerned… Any electronics supply should have a diodes sufficient for that.

if you search for "three phase rectifier" you will find plenty.
 
pollinator
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Location: Massachusetts, Zone:6/7, AHS:4, Rainfall:48in even Soil:SandyLoam pH6 Flat
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My information might be outdated because they are always releasing new products.
But as far as I know,
not all charge controllers can can accept the power coming from hydro/wind, So double check
also even if a charge controller can accept solar or hydro/wind, it can not do both at the same time.

So the short answer is that you are going to have to buy an additional charge controller.
These guys have a pretty neat product.
http://mwands.com/store/wind-solar-hybrid-charge-controllers&filter=2
 
William West
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Thanks everyone for the info!

One more question. I have a little piped spring nearby with about 6 gal/min flow would it be possible to hook up a DC turbine to this and hook right up to an extension cord? I know its probably a bit more complicated, but would that work for just lights, charging a phone?
 
Sebastian Köln
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Location: Abkhazia · temperate subtropical climate
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There are these small turbines with generators from china: aliexpress search. They write the minimum head is 8m (0.08MP). You probably will need a regulator to get a output voltage that doesn't fry your phone.
 
S Bengi
pollinator
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Location: Massachusetts, Zone:6/7, AHS:4, Rainfall:48in even Soil:SandyLoam pH6 Flat
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The power coming directly from the 6gal/min hydro would be too variable/dirty for any device with a transistor/mofset. So a cell phone is a no, even led/CF lighting is a no. Only the simplest of load like a super dumb motor with 'no switch/control' or a heating element, maybe if you get an old incandescent light bulb you will be okay with lots of brown out, blackout, and over-current affecting it's lifespan.

The output is just too variable and some type of power conditioner/charge controller is going to be needed to produce a voltage/frequency that is more stable.

As to whether or not it is able to provide 5W to power a cellphone or 30W to power a light bulb. Can you state the height/pressure in addition to the flow (6gal/min) and also the efficiency of your generator setup so that we can calculate the output. Also what is the flow variability between the "Wet' season and the "dry" season.
 
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