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Mycogrow in Hugelkutur

 
Posts: 107
Location: Iron River MI
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Hello friends! I live in Michigan’s upper peninsula and just finished building a couple woody beds to be planted next spring. I’m not sure what I’m planting in them yet, but thought incorporating some fungus would be a good idea for improved plant growth and possibly harvesting edible mushrooms. The beds are in full sun and the folks at Fungi Perfecti recommended mushroom beds like wine caps and oysters to be planted in a partially shaded location with fresh woodchips. My mulch is dirty wood bark shavings, so considering that and the beds location, I’m thinking edible fungi may be out of the question. I’m considering buying some mycogrow for vegetables to use when planting the beds but am unsure if it’s really going to do me any good. The beds are full of partially to mostly rotten wood of various tree species, full of fungi and mycelium already. I topped that with fresh mulched maple leaves, produce scraps and then the topsoil removed to build the beds. With the amount of fungi in the logs, would mycogrow really be a benefit? Any advice is appreciated!
 
pollinator
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Location: Virginia USDA 7a/b
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First decide on species.

I have had poor success with stropharia in deep mulch. It seems to prefer light mulch. This limits it in areas I deep mulch.

Oysters I am inoculating in logs to contain the chips in the bed. No word yet, this is just starting out.
 
pollinator
Posts: 3114
Location: Massachusetts, Zone:6/7, AHS:4, Rainfall:48in even Soil:SandyLoam pH6 Flat
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Kefir has been the best fast acting soil microbe inoculant for me to date.
But I would still add some mycogrow even with you existing abundance of soil life due to the fact that you currently 'only' have decomposition fungi but not sharing/trading fungi. And the mycogrow also comes with good bacteria too.

https://fungi.com/collections/mycogrow/products/mycogrow_soluble?variant=12125274472560
 
Brody Ekberg
Posts: 107
Location: Iron River MI
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Tj Jefferson, I like your ideas and am curious how they turn out. I was strategically tossing various edible wild mushrooms (unfit to eat) around the property in hopes to spread spores. I took some prints as well and may try to get something started with them. I also have a couple logs going with lions mane plugs that should fruit next year.

S Bengi, thank you for the advice. That is exactly the product i was looking at buying. It seems to be very well rounded and could be used for a wide variety of future plantings.
 
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Food Forest Card Game - Game Forum
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