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Tornado proofing

 
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As an Australian, now living in SC-USA, I am amazed at the low quality of buildings in Hurricane/Tornado/Flood prone zones.
Every year Thousands of people are displaced, hundreds killed and the cost to the community is always in the millions.
I understand that the economics of a Category 5 safe home is beyond the means of most people, so I looked at alternatives.
I have developed a Tornado Bathroom that can serve as the core for all new home builds.
The concept is simple. Build a prestressed concrete bunker to be used as the main bathroom.
While this may not save the rest of the house, it will save lives and provide a core for the rest of the house to be anchored to and cantivered from.
I have nothing to sell.
I am attempting to have a trial Tornado Bathroom incorporated into a new build, in Tornado Alley.
The concept is to have the specifications included into Building Codes, FEMA accreditation and available free to all home builders who are able to provide a more secure housing alternative.
More information is available at www.domistat.com/tornado

-Beau-
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pollinator
Posts: 2184
Location: Zone 5 Wyoming
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We just have a basement. We all have basements.
 
Beau Nestor
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elle sagenev wrote:We just have a basement. We all have basements.



I was discussing New Builds, but the problem with basements is that you can end up with a house collapsed on top of you and unable to get out, you can be missed by rescue workers, and you can drown.
The main bathroom is usually in the center of the first floor of the house and can be reached in a few seconds.
Thanks for your input.
Beau
 
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right on
i would like a tornado proof room as well
 
pollinator
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Location: Big Island, Hawaii (2300' elevation, 60" avg. annual rainfall, temp range 55-80 degrees F)
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Having a core safe room is a good idea. Here in Hawaii, many architects and builders are recommending them due to hurricanes. Our building officials attempted to modify the building code to require them (all sorts of requirements including a dedicated telephone, which to me didn't make sense because if the storm is that bad that people are stuck inside their safe rooms, the phone lines wouldn't be functionall). Once it was disclosed that this requirement would increase the cost of the building the home by a minimum of $30,000 to $40,000, there was a public outcry. Housing is already outrageously pricy here, and adding that much more to the price tag simply blocks more people from being able to become homeowners. So after lots of protests, the idea was shelved....as far as making it mandatory. It's still a recommendation.

Personally I'm not in favor of mandatory building codes on agricultural land, although I support full disclosure when a property sells. I would resent being forced to built a $30,000 addition to a house that cost me $60,000 to build. I already have access to a pretty good storm shelter. It's called a cave (actually it's an old lava tube).
 
pollinator
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Location: OK High Plains Prairie, 23" rain avg
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Beau Nestor, I notice you have the concrete storm shelter attached to the house and on your website it is attached to the shipping container. Yesterday I looked at FEMA's Design Drawings and 70-page booklet Taking Shelter from the Storm. They keep the shelter separate from the house when it is in ground. I didn't notice if that is true when the shelter is above ground. FEMA P-320, Taking Shelter from the Storm: Building a Safe Room for Your Home or Small Business (2014)

I would like my storm shelter to be my bed nook or bedroom. That way I can sleep at night and not worry about weather alerts. If I was in Dixie Alley which is what they call the Southeast tornado alley I would definitely want my bedroom to be the shelter as more tornadoes come through at night there than in Tornado Alley.
 
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