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Shade Tolerant trees for privacy in the winter

 
Posts: 21
Location: Northern pennsylvania, zone 5b
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I'm looking for a tree that is shade Tolerant and can provide privacy along a hundred meter or so section of roadside.  Currently, there is a patch of deciduous trees that are not cutting it.   Any Suggestions?

Evergreens would obviously be good for providing privacy.  Potentially a Korean Pine nut?  Do they tolerant shade? How long it would take them to get to about 10 feet tall and start providing privacy?
 
gardener
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Location: Western Washington
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Depending on where you are you might try to at least include silverberry. They supposedly do ok in sun or shade. Although they're related to goumi berries (which commonly defoliate in the winter) they're supposed to be evergreen I believe. They're a nitrogen fixer and should grow pretty fast. I've heard they grow to fifteen feet, but results will vary. I've only seen plants that have been in the ground for a year or so. One friend has his in pretty solid shade and it makes berries here in Washington. In mild climates they'll make berries in the spring and in the autumn their flowers are good bee forage, again depending on your climate.
 
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White pines did well if they get some sun.  They don't need much and they are beautiful fast growers.  Mine get over 10 feet in about 4 years.  They are nice thick trees and start providing some privacy with a couple years if you plant a staggered row of them.
 
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Depends on your climate. Please add it in your profile, will save us all time.

I use holly. Naturally evergreen shade tolerant plants like rhododendron, magnolia and cedar all are good screen trees in this climate. Some bamboo stays sort of evergreen.
 
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