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Mesquite from bean to pod

 
                            
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If one plantedHoney Mesquite beans how many years till the resulting tree began to produce pods?

Also I see that it is a favorite food for Coyotes and am concerned about attracting them to my property.  I'm wondering if Coyotes in Washington State would have a clue about the pods being edible since Mesquite wouldn't be a part of their natural food sources up here.

Finally could the taproot seek out water sources like an irrigation canal?  I have on above my property and am considering whether to avoid a planting location close to it for fear of the roots rupturing the side of the canal.
 
John Polk
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Honey Mesquite can be both beneficial, and a problem.  The tap root can reach a depth of nearly 200 feet, and it also has a substantial system of shallower roots.  It will find water.  Researchers in Texas have blamed its voracious appetite for water as being a cause of the lowering of the water table in areas where the tree is common.

It is so greedy for water, that not much else can survive near it.  Being a legume, it is a nitrogen fixer.

See also:  http://texastreeplanting.tamu.edu/Display_Onetree.aspx?tid=68

The World Conservation Union considers it one of the most problematic invasive species in the world.

 
Tyler Ludens
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John Polk wrote:
  Researchers in Texas have blamed its voracious appetite for water as being a cause of the lowering of the water table in areas where the tree is common.


It's mainly a problem where overgrazing and other practices have enabled it to proliferate.  We have maybe 3 or 4 of the trees on our place, and they don't appear to steal water from other plants.  They certainly aren't invading.  I would like more of them. 

Texans like to blame their lowering water tables on anything but Texans. 

 
Kirk Hutchison
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Location: Los Angeles, CA
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Oh wow! I used to think the root systems went 50 feet deep, but I guess I read it incorrectly (not 50 ft... 50 meters!). I found some good information here: http://www.desertusa.com/mag06/may/mesquite.html
 
Neitz TX
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I have a large Mesquite tree in my back yard with a large Opuntia ellisiana cactus that will actucaly get so big it cant support itself right next to the mesquite. and a Very large Fig tree next to both and 2 small small peach frees behind the fig and i think the fig tree is what is hurting them because its getting so big.


As far as growing from the pod. i have no idea. but there was some land just down the road thats maybe..7-8 acres that was just grasing pasture maybe 3 years ago that has been taken over by mesquite thats taller then the horses in the pasture.
 
John Polk
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Mesquite tap roots have been measured at 58 metres!  Four to five foot "bushes" (more common in true desert conditions) have had lateral roots measured at 10x the height.  It is a plant well adapted to arid/semi-arid conditions.  It will find water anywhere near it.

(And, NO, "metres" is not mis-spelled...the only English speaking country in the world that spells it "meters" is the U.S...the only country that does not use the metric system!).
 
                            
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So I still like the idea of getting some Mesquite growing up here but I'm thinking I want to put a swale in on the hill above the canal and start one up there.  Based on the 58 metre (loved that post wish we had a 'thanks' button) planting halfway up the hill would put that depth of taproot about 60 feet above the water table so it should stay small and controlled and it wouldn't destroy the downhill side of the canal.

Maybe I should introduce some seeds to Bateman Island which is totally covered with Russian Olive and watch the competition.  Being on an island they would have the entire Columbia River to suck up
 
I agree. Here's the link: https://richsoil.com/wood-heat.jsp
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