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Annie Lochte

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since Jul 14, 2016
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chicken forest garden goat
I find happiness in... growing things, plants and animals, piddling along the edge of ponds and waterways.... exploring the woods... learning new things, being independent...
The Ocala National Forest. Florida, USA
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Recent posts by Annie Lochte

Looks like my MS late season. I'm in north central fl and its already done for the season, but trying to sprout from seeds it dropped now... A few warm days and I got lil plants of it trying to grow...  The black seeds will shrivel an turn grayish and should be viable. I'd pick the black ones an let them dry naturally to save seed. I did first couple years but it went crazy and dropped seed everywhere and I don't save any longer. I never worried about the spots and just cut it back when it got to ugly and it sprang back to life when the days were longer an we got rain.... Mine seemed to go gang busters for a time then fade an get the spots an such.... Cutting it back never hurt it but we've now had some low 30*s temps and that put it to bed. The original plant dies completely with the cold but the seed does just fine.
5 months ago
Awww! I am sorry! It is hard to say what caused their demise. Generally goats are finicky creatures that require different dietary/mineral inputs than most other domestic livestock. Without a detailed history it's impossible for me to speculate about why that happened. Birthing 4 kids is alot of work for a doe. Any others possibly bred watch for full udder, usually right before kidding (12-24hrs)their teats will strut out tight an full. (but not always) Their girly bits behind will get long and loose and may string some mucus. They may paw the ground, stretch alot, rub along the fence lines more than usual, stand around curling their upper lip. Some want to go off by themselves, others want to stay with the herd. Keeping them out of freezing weather and rain is a must if you think kidding is eminent. Pat Colby's, 'Natural Goat Keeping' is a book I have learned a lot from and use it whenever a problem comes up. Some goats... Or members within a breed, such as boers, have been bred for maximum income and not so much hardiness and mothering ability. I have read of people buying nice papered, bred does for their kids 4-H projects and them being terrible at birthing and mothering....  Again, I am very sorry you lost those kids...  

Edit to add... For her I would watch her udder. If your not going to milk her then I would just keep an eye on how full it is, how long it takes to start reabsorbing the milk. It should start to shrink in 1-3 days. If it remains tight and full for more than a couple days she may get mastitis. Generally they act sick, go off feed, have a fever when they get mastitis. If she were mine I would also not feed much commercial feed ration for a bit, but all the high quality hay/browse she wants. That'll help stop milk production.
Bark looks very similar to my persimmons. I have the Japanese variety. They are last to leaf out in spring, and get green flowers with the first flush of leaves, fruit ready sept-oct. In florida.
5 months ago
I have a gazillion oak leaves an pile them in wire bins made of short pieces of no-climb fence turned in a circle an hooked to itself. They average 3-4' in diameter. I set them on a piece of tin. I pack in the leaves. I stuff it full an in time it goes down. It takes a long time for oak leaves but in 1-3 years it makes beautiful soil. I set tin under it or the tree roots find their way in and make getting the stuff much more difficult. I don't cover mine and actually pitch in my dogs poo on occasion. Years ago I lived with a couple giant sycamores and their leaves broke down much faster...
6 months ago
Chestnut Hill Tree Nursery near Gainesville use to have some. I haven't looked at their website lately.
6 months ago
Hi David! I love the style of your 'modern' cracker style home! I don't have anything to ad to what others have written on the humidity problem, but having lived in a few old cracker houses, all wooden, the tall roof/ceilings, floor to ceiling windows, all built facing the winter sunrise or set... With huge trees growing to shade the porch in the summertime... One we were doing some remodeling on had hay stuffed in the walls for insulation and the ceiling in the kitchen was 11' tall. It was built in 1905. I never used AC until I moved to this tin can I have now... I never have liked drywall and this trailer had drywall hung in it before I bought it... It insulates it alright, holds the summer heat inside for many long hours after the sun goes down... None of the cracker houses I lived in had humidity probs like the cement block barns I spend a lot of time in. Working in block horse barns sometimes when certain weather fronts approaching the walls and slab 'sweat' like crazy... The walls are painted, and a couple have a concrete hardy board over the block, an they get wet. Once the front passes everything dries, sometimes in just an hour or 2. And of course, the summer that just passed was a wet one for sure... The simplicity of your build is well received here.  
Annie
7 months ago

Kio Starfield wrote:

Annie Lochte wrote:Hi Kio! I'm relatively close and grow persimmons, the big Japanese variety, they do very well. Also have figs, peaches, blueberrys, papayas, bananas, mulberry, pears, kumquats, calamondon, guava (cattley) all do well, the bananas and papayas freeze back but generally come back every summer with a little water once it warms up. I planted apples a couple years ago an haven't kept up with their feeding schedule needed to produce yet. There's more. Blackberry, poke, grape, elderberry an more grows wild close by. My advise is make sure the things you really want to produce gets enough light. Some of this stuff planted 17-18 years ago is getting to much shade now from oaks that have grown into monsters... An not producing anymore. I don't baby much thru winter... an then it's just to get established the first couple years.

Eta, ginger, turmeric do well in the shade, an malabar spinach, yard long beans, Seminole pumpkins, sweet potatoes, I planted once an some come back every year...



How coincindental! I just went to the Farmers Market yesterday, bought some persimmons and tried them for the first time. They were delicious! I shared them with some friends and they also thought so! One of them was scared at first because it looked like a tomato and they hate tomatoes, so we had to explain it was a delicious sweet fruit.

Can you share what varieties of Bananas, peaches, and pears you grow? I believe pears and peaches require a minimum number of chill hours so I want to make sure I choose the right varieties. And certain bananas aren't very cold hardy here in North Florida.

I am actually planning on thinning out quite a few trees on my lot. I want to take a hybrid approach to permaculture, and any plant I can't get a use out of and takes up too much space I will remove. I have a few turkey oaks I'm planning on cutting down, not sure if I will propagate them. I am planning on purchasing more loblolly pine saplings and propagating them because the shade they provide is small, and they provide abundant pine needles which are great for mulch!

Hopefully this isn't against the rules but, if you are nearby, would you be willing to sell any cuttings you may have or be willing to propogate? I am searching for people in my area with forest gardens and other permaculture styled gardens to get some tips and tricks from.



I'm near Moss Bluff/Lynn your welcome to come get cuttings, an I have some seeds to share. I'll PM you my number. I'm not real sure of the names of what I have, I've lived in the area all my life an dug up, took cuttings, etc most of what I have. Couple things got from David the Good when he lived in the area... An bought the persimmon trees from lowes one winter.
7 months ago
Hi Kio! I'm relatively close and grow persimmons, the big Japanese variety, they do very well. Also have figs, peaches, blueberrys, papayas, bananas, mulberry, pears, kumquats, calamondon, guava (cattley) all do well, the bananas and papayas freeze back but generally come back every summer with a little water once it warms up. I planted apples a couple years ago an haven't kept up with their feeding schedule needed to produce yet. There's more. Blackberry, poke, grape, elderberry an more grows wild close by. My advise is make sure the things you really want to produce gets enough light. Some of this stuff planted 17-18 years ago is getting to much shade now from oaks that have grown into monsters... An not producing anymore. I don't baby much thru winter... an then it's just to get established the first couple years.

Eta, ginger, turmeric do well in the shade, an malabar spinach, yard long beans, Seminole pumpkins, sweet potatoes, I planted once an some come back every year...
7 months ago
Although I started the harvest in mid sept, the Japanese persimmons are ripening and by estimate it'll be 150-5oz persimmons for October. Planted that tree 18 years ago, paid like $35. for it and since maturity it produces around 75-100lbs of fruit a year. It does take every 4th or 5th year off. It'll get pruned by 1/4 this year though, to many out of reach due height. The sweet potatoes I'll be digging up soon and got 6 seminole pumpkins when I pulled all the vines last week. There's also a few (4-5) cow horn peppers that'll be ready anytime too. I've been bad about getting winter stuff planted, I need to get with that.
8 months ago
I feel your pain Gail. I lost 2 of my dog family this year. They were such an integral part of my everyday life an I miss them a lot. I think pets are here with us to keep reminding us what unconditional love is in a world where it is often lacking... They just don't have long enough life spans... Hugs. Annie
8 months ago