Win a copy of Herbal Medicine From the Heart of the Earth this week in the Medicinal Herbs forum!

Josh Garbo

+ Follow
since Jun 01, 2018
Josh likes ...
chicken forest garden fungi homestead urban woodworking
Learning permaculture by doing... not always as quickly and efficiently as I'd like. Long-term interest in establishing Appalachian VA/NC farm and community.
Of Germanic/Hungarian descent, seeking to honor my ancestors through farming and caring for the Land. Inspired by European and North American indigenous spirituality.
Seeking to understand large-scale (50+ acre) silvopasture, tree cropping, agro-forestry, rotational grazing, cover cropping, earth-work construction, and animal management. Long-term goal is to convert large swaths of inexpensive/marginal Appalachian monoculture or scrub forest into highly productive and profitable eco-systems.
Zone 7a, 42", Fairfax VA Piedmont (clay, acidic, shady)
Apples and Likes
Apples
Total received
25
In last 30 days
0
Total given
0
Likes
Total received
154
Received in last 30 days
1
Total given
114
Given in last 30 days
1
Forums and Threads
Scavenger Hunt
expand First Scavenger Hunt

Recent posts by Josh Garbo

Hi Ruth, thanks for the offer, but I'm happy to order some too. Does it compost completely sealed?

Current idea is to use a large IBC tote, with top open, drainage holes in bottom opening into a small pit, lots of worms, screen on top (but open to accept rain), black tarp over it in winter for warmth, maybe some grass seeds in there during summer.
1 month ago
I was thinking more about running a relatively large DC water heater (200 -300W) element inside a fairly large wooden oven (lined with tinfoil big enough for a big roasting pan, maybe 3 cubic ft) and line that whole assembly with 2-4 inches of poly-iso foam with a lid.  The goal would be to get it to baking temps for breads, etc, but could also be used as a slow cooker for meats/veggies if the temps did not make it that high.  You could also let it sit for a while to cook longer.  

1 month ago
I can't really retrofit my home toilet septic line too well; however, I wondered if this could be done on a smaller scale with an inside worm box.  That would help with worm survival and also make human usage more pleasant (no one wants to sit in a cold outhouse during the winter!).  Wonder if a 4ft wide/long, 2ft high box (with a bucket toilet on top) would work.  That would be 32 sq ft of wood chips and worms, with drainage on the bottom (the drainage could get gross).  I'd probably limit the liquid waste going in to the system, unless the worms like it damp.  Then I'd add soil, decomposing wood chips, leaves (in fall), and maybe cardboard to the pile.
1 month ago
Thanks Cristo, I will check that out.  I certainly do not want to make an inadvertent biogas digestor!  

Incidentally, this would only be for solid wastes, as I have a septic tank for liquids (and haven't bothered with greywater).

I have IBC Totes too; probably would not be hard to bury them somewhat and then throw a black tarp over to keep them warmer in the winter.
1 month ago
I'm a big fan of running bamboo because I have a one-acre suburban property with high privacy needs and I have the ability to keep it under control with mowing and digging (also I have a lot of shade and established tree root systems that limit its spread).  It'd be different if I had a large property with great soil and grasslands.  I use it along my creek, as a windbreak, and for privacy.  Still establishing itself, so far so good.  I think bamboo is the best choice in my climate for thin yet dense privacy hedges, along with erosion control.
1 month ago
Hello, I know most compost toilets and piles are aerobic to aid in breakdown.  However, I was curious if you could use a 55-gallon black plastic drum to hold the material (after first collecting it in a smaller bucket with a carbon cover material like wood-chips).  I'm fairly sure a drum in the summer here could get up to the temperature needed to kill parasites (maybe i could put up some reflectix to reflect the sun back on to the drum like a mini solar cooker), as long as it was sealed.

I figure doing it this way might be safer than just having a big pile covered with wood-chips, and would also look nicer in suburbia.  Perhaps I am being over-paranoid, but I don't like the idea of a big pile that wildlife and my dog could get into.
1 month ago
very interesting - cooking with insulation and 120 watts.  implies that most heat used for cooking is basically wasted out the oven door or wood stove top. so you could presumably easily run an insulated oven with a 300W solar panel (direct DC heat resistance) for several hours, given a few hours of sun.

separate question, has anyone run a parabolic solar heater on to some kind of vacuum insulated container like this below?  you would have to paint it black of course.  I believe radiation heating goes through a vacuum, which is what allows the GoSun solar cookers to be so effective.

https://www.webstaurantstore.com/thunder-group-sej73000-60-cup-wood-grain-insulated-sushi-rice-pot/407SEJ73000.html
1 month ago
Bamboo and willow rods, IMO, along with the mesh others mentioned.
I have mine in two sections growing on a very marginal section of land (steep hill by driveway, compacted/gravel soil).  Mowing should keep them under control, along with heavy shade by the forest border.  I also am putting some into very poor rocky/clay subsoil that I want to transform into something more productive.  My understanding is that mowing and inter-planting with other trees will keep them under control.  Mowing will kill off shoots that pop up where they're not supposed to, and should compel root die-off/put nitrogen into soil.  I'm also trying to build a rough BL hedge in spots, which I hope to keep at around 8 feet high with a hedge trimmer; willl keep inter-planting trees and hope to get good density (will not be for livestock control, just privacy).
1 month ago
Mine composted naturally a bit after sitting for a year and growing mycellium from random spores; they had crumbled too much for a pitchfork so I used a shovel.  Two-wheel plastic bed wheelbarrow is pretty sturdy and hauls a lot; I just dump in place.  Pretty amazing how quickly they collapse into the soil - as others here have said.  I'm also piling up leaves from the neighbors.
1 month ago