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how to protect fuzzy kiwi from severe cold

 
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I have some young fuzzy kiwi that I am worried about surviving the severe cold expected next week.  I think I am at the extreme northern end of where this kiwi can survive.  
Does it make sense to use pipe wrap about the base for maybe a foot and pile woodchips around that?
 
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I'm in Lacey's Spring and haven't put anything on mine.  So far (several years) they haven't been hurt.  It couldn't hurt to put a heavy mulch on them.
 
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Sounds similar to raising figs in MO. Wrapping figs with pipe wrap can cause mold to girdle them. They grow back from the roots. I dont know if kiwi does or not. How old are your Kiwi?
 
Dennis Bangham
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The fuzzy are almost a year old since I planted them.  The hardy kiwi should have no problem since it is a cold weather variety but the fuzzy kiwi i have is a A. Chinensis out of Auburn University and I may be the farthest north they have been attempted to grow.
 
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Fuzzy kiwi is hardy to 0F (zone 7/6). They grow to 100ft so even if you get a bit of dieback due to your specific cultivar selection it should be fine.
 
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I once had my fuzzy kiwis get killed back to the ground by a severe winter, but they grew back quickly from the roots the following spring and were flowering 2 years later.  

As far as protection, I’ve thrown a blanket across the top of the “tee” trellis with it dropping to the ground on both sides to protect the flowers from late frosts and would likely try this in the event of another severe cold snap, possibly in combination with a small propane heater under the blanket.
 
Dennis Bangham
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Mike Turner wrote:I once had my fuzzy kiwis get killed back to the ground by a severe winter, but they grew back quickly from the roots the following spring and were flowering 2 years later.  

As far as protection, I’ve thrown a blanket across the top of the “tee” trellis with it dropping to the ground on both sides to protect the flowers from late frosts and would likely try this in the event of another severe cold snap, possibly in combination with a small propane heater under the blanket.



The ones I lost were grafts of golden kiwi onto green root stock. The root stock did come back and I am trying to graft some quality fruits back on.  I think it will be trial and error for the first several years until the root system gets better established.
 
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I'm northeast of Atlanta and I've got 48 fuzzy kiwi that have done just fine through the last couple winters.   About 40 of the vines I've put mulch and piled up leaves around the base to protect the root crown.  The others I just left out with minimal protection to see how they would do on their own ( no mulch or leaves ) .    They've all done fine.     At the beginning of this year I had my first flowers, but a couple late frosts destroyed all the buds.   I'll try wrapping them with blankets or something this next year.  

The other option to protect from a late frost is I've got a lot of rocks that I might stack around the Kiwi Trellis.   Hopefully the rocks will absorb heat during the day and slowly release it at night.    
 
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