Win a copy of For the Love of Paw Paws this week in the Fruit Trees forum!
  • Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
permaculture forums growies critters building homesteading energy monies kitchen purity ungarbage community wilderness fiber arts art permaculture artisans regional education experiences global resources the cider press projects digital market permies.com private forums all forums
this forum made possible by our volunteer staff, including ...
master stewards:
  • Nicole Alderman
  • r ranson
  • Anne Miller
  • paul wheaton
stewards:
  • Jocelyn Campbell
  • Mike Jay Haasl
  • Burra Maluca
garden masters:
  • James Freyr
  • Joylynn Hardesty
  • Steve Thorn
  • Greg Martin
gardeners:
  • Carla Burke
  • Dave Burton
  • Pearl Sutton

3rd world grassroots phosphorus solution

 
gardener
Posts: 2676
181
forest garden fungi trees books food preservation bike
 
gardener
Posts: 6280
Location: Vilonia, Arkansas - Zone 7B/8A stoney, sandy loam soil pH 6.5
1033
hugelkultur dog forest garden duck fish fungi hunting books chicken writing homestead
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Good find there John, I must say I am impressed that this article lays out the whole subject from Problem ID through to solutions and it even brings up the importance of the soil microbes.

Redhawk
 
John Suavecito
gardener
Posts: 2676
181
forest garden fungi trees books food preservation bike
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
It's nice to know that the message is spreading across the globe.
John S
PDX OR
 
Bryant RedHawk
gardener
Posts: 6280
Location: Vilonia, Arkansas - Zone 7B/8A stoney, sandy loam soil pH 6.5
1033
hugelkultur dog forest garden duck fish fungi hunting books chicken writing homestead
  • Likes 2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Yes it is, Africa seems to be one of the most resistant areas when it comes to farmers making the necessary changes to their thinking too.

Once we can get all farmers realizing that they must focus on growing their soil instead of growing plants (crops) then the world will be in a good position to provide enough food for the growing population.

Redhawk
 
pollinator
Posts: 376
Location: Boudamasa, Chad
76
  • Likes 2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

Bryant RedHawk wrote:Yes it is, Africa seems to be one of the most resistant areas when it comes to farmers making the necessary changes to their thinking too.

Once we can get all farmers realizing that they must focus on growing their soil instead of growing plants (crops) then the world will be in a good position to provide enough food for the growing population.

Redhawk



This is partly due to the fact that the Western ag system has been fed to them as their greatest hope. There are many beneficial traditional agricultural practices in Africa that have been abandoned because of the promise of fertilizers and pesticides. Yes, traditional African agriculture is slash and burn, but it also was no-till and fields were left fallow for decades at a time. The plow was introduced by colonialists. It dramatically boosted production in the short term and allowed individuals to mono-crop much larger surfaces...and then become dependent on chemical fertilizers to maintain that yield. If you think plowing depletes soil in the temperate regions of the world, the heat of the tropics absolutely devours plowed soil. Again, it boosts yield impressively, but according to my observation it only lasts about ten years before the field is spent. And that's just with oxen-drawn plows!

If that weren't hard enough, Western ag companies introduced hybrid corn (now GMO corn, of course) in places like Kenya and Zimbabwe, along with chemical fertilizers as a way to maintain yield. Basically in a hot climate, your field is just a hydroponic medium at that point, EXTREMELY vulnerable to variations in rainfall. So you can say that African farmers are "resistant" to making changes, but the fact is, they're trapped by the ag companies in a neo-colonialism. In places like Chad, where I live, the ag companies haven't made it here yet, but they're still trapped by poverty. You can't afford to experiment with "sustainable" methods when the method you know is the only thing between you and starvation from one year to the next.

You want change in Africa? Get on a plane and roll up your sleeves, like Mr. Johann van der Ham. In the African context only personal investment will produce development in thinking.
 
Posts: 203
Location: NNSW Australia
29
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Shame they're using chicken manure, I would've thought pigeons would excrete more phosphorous and be more suited to the climate.
 
Catch Ernie! Catch the egg! And catch this tiny ad too:
Dave Burton's Boot Adventures at Wheaton Labs and Basecamp
https://permies.com/t/119676/permaculture-projects/Dave-Burton-Boot-Adventures-Wheaton
  • Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
Boost this thread!