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Chestnut wood for roofs etc  RSS feed

 
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Does anyone here build roof structures , lintels , window frames from chestnut wood , Not sawn but selected tree trunk or limb and hewn using the natural shape to add strength ?. Pre 1900 style of construction.
Thanks
 
pollinator
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I don't have experience with this, but it seems the most common uses is using a froe to split off shakes for roofing, and using coppice-wood (small branches) for fencing/latticework.

Many videos on YouTube of the rural English reviving these lost arts.
 
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Malcolm Thomas wrote:Does anyone here build roof structures , lintels , window frames from chestnut wood , Not sawn but selected tree trunk or limb and hewn using the natural shape to add strength ?. Pre 1900 style of construction.
Thanks



Somehow yes, but only for small constructions selected tree parts. It does get to heavy if you are working alone quickly and complete trunks tend to crack (especially outside) I made some roof parts with chestnut, about 450x20x10 cm. There are some guides allowing to get relatively usable output using a chainsaw. Though it needs at least 5 hp and a chain with 10 (iirc) degree teeth. But be aware you might need some help or machinery to lift logs the sizen needed onto two or more support logs to be able to saw and turn the log manually.

Very important with chestnut is to decorticate (especially if you want to use them outside) the logs you want to use quickly. It is much easier if the tree is fresh and there won't be larvae inside.
 
Malcolm Thomas
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Chestnut  wood on par with oak , but the blight got them many years ago, however on going work is trying to re establish them again so i,m led to believe.
I chopped some old rotten chestnut the other day and inside was good wood about 8-9 inch dia and got sections on the band saw and cleaned up and now have usable blocks , amazing wood .
Now they import wood from Scandinavian country's for building but it is machined .
Yes the logs are very heavy, some houses here have not just slate on the roof but slabs of slate so the structure has to be hefty.
 
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