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Open Source Building Project - Small Skiddable Building Base  RSS feed

 
Posts: 219
Location: S.E. Michigan - Zone 6a
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Hello,

After following the Scrum-based hardware effort of the guys over at WikiSpeed I got thinking about doing a much smaller project.  I'm going to have a need for several small shed-like structures around my property starting with a garden tool shed.  I like the idea of making them "skidable"  so I can move them around the property as my needs change.

I'm looking to see if there is interest in forming a group to develop a set of open source modular plans starting with the base.  I'm looking for people that will actually try building what is proposed as well as someone able to do sketch-up drawings.  I've been a product manager/owner for more than 10 years in the software world and would like to try and transfer these skills to hardware, well building.

If you are interested send me a message or comment here.  Depending on the interest I will find some collaboration option that will work.

Regards,
Jerry
 
Jerry Ward
Posts: 219
Location: S.E. Michigan - Zone 6a
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Anyone?  Anyone? Bueller?
 
pollinator
Posts: 553
Location: Southern Illinois
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Jerry,

Interesting idea.  What other types of buildings or skids do you have in mind?  You mentioned a portable tool shed.  A thought I have would be a small portable workshop with a dedicated workbench and clamping devices for holding in place item with which I would be working.  

I really like the concept and wish I had seen your post earlier, but I would need to know more specifics in order to give any more meaningful input.

Let me know more of your thoughts,

Eric
 
Jerry Ward
Posts: 219
Location: S.E. Michigan - Zone 6a
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I was thinking more about the size of the footprint and then the inside details would depend on need.  Also the design would be something that could be made longer.  Once you know how to build the floor, wall posts & roof then you can adapt to your needs.

Small would be a "4-by" building, that is 4'x4', 4'x8', 4'x12'
Medium would be 6'x
Large would be 8'x

Things I can think of are:
Tool (or any kind of) shed
Potting station
Chicken coop
Small equipment shelter
Picnic shelter
 
Posts: 156
Location: Philippines
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Jerry, How about rollable rather than skidable. Say a detachable pair of wheels that goes whichever shed needs moving.
 
julian Gerona
Posts: 156
Location: Philippines
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and also a pair of detachable handles on the opposite side of wheels that goes into slots. that way the shed converts to a shedbarrow.
 
Jerry Ward
Posts: 219
Location: S.E. Michigan - Zone 6a
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Rollable would basically have the same structure as it would have to be self-supporting.  However, the kind of weight would make the tires needed something like trailer tires, which really increases the cost.  Further, considering the frequency of moving would dictate skids or wheels.  This is specifically for something that would be moved infrequently, thus the skids.
 
Posts: 279
Location: Greybull WY north central WY zone 4 bordering on 3
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Why would you go to all that extra work for buildings that are built for their purpose so most of them would be different anyway.  The only reason these would be different and that is skids and those are a cookie cutter item.  I grew up with buildings on skids and have dealt with them for 40 years.  It is common in this area because buildings on skids don't count against property tax where if they have a foundation they do.  There are some limits on size too, to qualify.

In general there are 2 width criteria for a building.  The first is 8' 6" which is the maximum legal width to move without needing over size load signs and permitting.  The second criteria is the maximum width for oversize load without needing follow and lead cars and special permitting which is I think 12 feet(If I am wrong someone correct me on it)  Height criteria depends on the trailers you have  to move them on and your local load limits.  The skids are most commonly railroad ties but can be steel, concrete, wood.  Would love to try skids made out of fiber reinforced HDPE recycled plastic.  It would be ideal.  Never rot, incredibly wear resistant, easy to attach to etc.  My favorite of the ones tried is large drill stem.  It is so heavy it takes many decades to rust away and is incredibly durable.  Big advantage of steel is that it is easy to build in cross bracing to keep the building from racking when towed.  If the building has a floor it needs to be well cross braced to prevent racking.  If it has a dirt floor normal procedure is to run heavy cross braces diagonally both directions in the building before moving and remove them when it reaches the location.  Most common is simply to use railroad ties.  After sitting a few decades when moved they often shed a bunch of wood when moved but they work well.  If bigger is needed the treated big bridge planks work well.  The tow eyes need to be built in on both ends of each skid.  In ties or concrete ideally there is a tension rod that runs the full length of the skid and a flat plate at each end to distribute the pressure from it.  Normal logs are good for a decade or 2 but usually carpenter ants or rot mean the skid needs to be replaced every couple of decades to move the building.  If it isn't moved they will support the building longer but don't work for skids.(would love to try one of the rot resistant woods like black locust here)  But in this area logs are typically pine, spruce or cottonwood.

Beyond that your skids are determined by your building and your materials.  Since small buildings are built for the purpose which is specific to the user and the skids are for the building why would you worry about a bunch of CAD stuff for general purpose?
 
Did you see how Paul cut 87% off of his electric heat bill with 82 watts of micro heaters?
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