• Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
permaculture forums growies critters building homesteading energy monies kitchen purity ungarbage community wilderness fiber arts art permaculture artisans regional education experiences global resources the cider press projects digital market permies.com private forums all forums
this forum made possible by our volunteer staff, including ...
master stewards:
  • Nicole Alderman
  • r ranson
  • Anne Miller
  • paul wheaton
  • Joseph Lofthouse
stewards:
  • Mike Jay
  • Jocelyn Campbell
  • Devaka Cooray
garden masters:
  • Steve Thorn
  • Dave Burton
  • Dan Boone
gardeners:
  • Joylynn Hardesty
  • Mandy Launchbury-Rainey
  • Mike Barkley

Extra wine cap spawn, suggestions?

 
pollinator
Posts: 640
Location: Southern Illinois
119
transportation cat dog fungi trees building writing rocket stoves woodworking
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Hello everyone,

So I am in an unusual situation, almost an embarrassment of riches.  Earlier this spring I ordered some new packages of wine cap spawn in order to inoculate two new beds and part of a third bed so that I can eventually have a total of 3 beds of mushroom compost.  My first bed of mushroom compost is extremely fertile this spring, without me adding a single ounce of any type of external fertilizer of any sort—not even my abundant comfrey or any other type of fertilizer.

I ordered 7 wine cap kits partially to get the price down and partially to make sure I had plenty of spawn based on last years growth.  However, even after applying generously, I still have two unopened kits left over.  I am wondering what I should do with them now.

I do plan on doing a serious trimming and chipping project in a couple of weeks and expect to get another nice pile of new chips in a 4th bed near the others.  One thought I have is to chip up some branches, stop and lay down a layer of spawn, and then add more chips.  The idea would be that while the chips sit and age for a year (my standard practice) they would be already inoculated and breaking down their first year.

I do have one last, small pile chips that I have left over.  It is a cone about 3 feet tall by 4 feet diameter.  I was saving it for another microbial project—my daughter dumps her bunny litter there on top of the chips and I have been adding my own urine.  I was planning on using this pile as a small bacterial dominated compost, but I guess I could add some of the spawn there.

Like I said earlier, I am open to suggestions and appreciate any input.

Eric
 
Posts: 24
Location: South East Kansas
1
trees books cooking
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Find a friend or neighbor and see if they want a mushroom bed. Or a local gardening club.
 
gardener
Posts: 5946
Location: Vilonia, Arkansas - Zone 7B/8A stoney, sandy loam soil pH 6.5
889
hugelkultur dog forest garden duck fish fungi hunting books chicken pig homestead
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
What a problem! Eric you could offer the extra spawn to friends or if you are a hiker, take a hike into the woods and give the forest your present, the forest people will love you for the gift.

Redhawk
 
pollinator
Posts: 869
Location: Virginia USDA 7a/b
153
hugelkultur forest garden hunting chicken food preservation bee
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Eric, my experience with sawdust spawn is that it is decently viable for 8 months if you keep it cool in the original bags. It won't be as good, but you don't need to use it right away. It could go longer, I just haven't pushed it further.

I always run out of spawn and then start something that I realize I could use it!
 
Eric Hanson
pollinator
Posts: 640
Location: Southern Illinois
119
transportation cat dog fungi trees building writing rocket stoves woodworking
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
TJ,

Maybe I should just save it and re-inoculate in the fall?
 
Posts: 171
Location: 7b desert southern Idaho
16
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I’ve been using wood chips as a mulch, a trail, to fight infections of goat heads. I would spread spawn on any of these areas. Especially in the garden! I’d even try it in my garden under some straw, just to see if I could get mushrooms without the chips.

 
Tj Jefferson
pollinator
Posts: 869
Location: Virginia USDA 7a/b
153
hugelkultur forest garden hunting chicken food preservation bee
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

Eric Hanson wrote:TJ,

Maybe I should just save it and re-inoculate in the fall?



I did that, got a deal on ten bags. Used them 6-8 months later. No problem if they are stored right. Funny story, actually remembered they were in the fridge in the back because we were processing other stuff and needed the space. Works great to throw kitchen scraps in with the chips when you inoculate, like we were cutting up and drying tomatos. As long as it is moist after inoculation you are fine. Cannot be dry.
 
It is no measure of health to be well adjusted to a profoundly sick society. -Krishnamurti Tiny ad:
It's like binging on 7 seasons of your favorite netflix permaculture show
http://permaculture-design-course.com/
  • Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
Boost this thread!